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New research compounds Ugandans' spirit of giving

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Added 29th September 2020 02:17 PM

The giving trends in this study, which was conducted before the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, come despite Uganda not yet achieving middle-income status.

New research compounds Ugandans' spirit of giving

The generosity of Ugandans has been further underlined in a new study

The giving trends in this study, which was conducted before the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, come despite Uganda not yet achieving middle-income status.

CHARITY

The scale of giving by middle-class Ugandans is revealed by a comprehensive new study of charitable giving published today.

Research commissioned by the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) in partnership with the Aga Khan Foundation, the CS Mott Foundation and the UK National Lottery Community Fund shows that people give away 31% of their monthly income - 1 shilling in 3 - to individuals or charitable organisations.

Moreover, when researchers tried to determine the percentage of people who had not given any informal gifts or support to family, friends and community members over the past year, the response was unanimous - 100% of those surveyed had given.

And more than 9 out of 10 people (93%) said their charitable giving did not leave them struggling to make ends meet - hinting that they might be able to give a bit more.

The giving trends in this study, which was conducted before the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, come despite Uganda not yet achieving middle-income status owing to falling growth rates - the result of drought and conflict in neighbouring nations. Uganda is home to 1.4 million refugees, the largest number in Africa.

The study built on previous research by CAF into the potential for charitable giving by the estimated 2.4 billion people set to join the world's middle classes by 2030. Estimates suggest that were members of the growing middle classes to give just over 0.5% of their spending, as much as $319 billion could be raised worldwide to support charities and strengthen organisations that speak up on behalf of society's most vulnerable.

Sameera Mehra, the head of global alliance development at CAF, said this generosity can potentially result in a more open democracy for Uganda.

"Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic this research had uncovered a base level of generosity in Uganda and the fact that most people did not even regard it as charitable giving - it was just a part of everyday life. This culture of informal support for family and neighbours has undoubtedly continued as the pandemic gripped and has effectively acted as a vital informal welfare system.

"As the world slowly recovers from the shock of COVID-19, the next step for Uganda is to build on this generosity to strengthen local, regional and national organisations.

 "By strengthening charities and civil society across Uganda, the country can invite more citizens to become involved in strengthening society.  A more open democracy will be the end result."

The report also found:

o   There is a deep-rooted belief in the importance of ‘paying it forward' - when someone received help in life, their instinct is to do similar for others

o   Cash payments remain the most popular way to give, but mobile payment services are also widely used

o   Around half of survey respondents (54%) had supported a faith-based organisation, the main type of formal charity or organisation supported

o   Among those who have supported a formal charity or organisation in the past 12 months, the most common cause was children and young people (78%); this was followed by helping the poor or hungry (62%)

o   Most people do not know about available tax incentives to charitable giving

 "Ugandans' willingness to give is part of our spirit and is on display in this important piece of research from the Charities Aid Foundation," said Jacqueline Asiimwe, the CEO of CivSource Africa.

"It reminds both Ugandans and those further afield that giving by people here - to help their families, friends, fellow citizens, and indeed those seeking safety from neighbouring countries, is a part of who we are.

"We have demonstrated throughout the Covid-19 crisis that we are a nation that helps others in need and those who can give are giving generously. We must now work to harness this generosity and use it for the benefit of wider society, including increasing participation in public life, strengthening our democracy and improving the living conditions of people across Uganda."

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