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COVID-19 lockdown: Children from well-to-do families studying more than those from poorer homesteads

By Andrew Masinde

Added 27th May 2020 08:08 AM

The closure of educational institutions in Uganda March 20 as one of the strategies to stop the spread of novel coronavirus saw over 15 million children sent back home. The Government through education ministry came up with various measures to ensure continuity of learning at home.

COVID-19 lockdown: Children from well-to-do families studying more than those from poorer homesteads

The closure of educational institutions in Uganda March 20 as one of the strategies to stop the spread of novel coronavirus saw over 15 million children sent back home. The Government through education ministry came up with various measures to ensure continuity of learning at home.

 
The BBC last week reported that a survey done for the Institute for Fiscal Studies found that children from wealthier families are spending more time studying during the COVID-19 lockdown than their counterparts from poorer families. In Uganda, the situation could even be worse.
 
The closure of educational institutions in Uganda March 20 as one of the strategies to stop the spread of novel coronavirus saw over 15 million children sent back home. The Government through education ministry came up with various measures to ensure continuity of learning at home. These included the use of on-line resources, the media and the printing and distribution of revision exercises to children in remote areas who do not have access to the radio, television and the internet. 
 
While these measures are supposed to be parallel for all children, those from the well-t-do families do not only have access to all these resources but their parents have also put in the necessary support system to ensure their children study. On the other hand, children from poorer homes have a lot of fetters, from lack of access to a variety of learning materials, to lack of space and support from parents who do not value education.
 
These issues affect all children in their homes; yours inclusive. Get the details of this story, in Mwalimu today; published everyday Wednesday in New Vision.

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