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We are coming for you, KCCA warns churches, bars

By Vision Reporter

Added 6th January 2020 07:22 PM

In February last year, KCCA closed two bars in the upscale Kololo over noise pollution and flouting public health regulations.

We are coming for you, KCCA warns churches, bars

In February last year, KCCA closed two bars in the upscale Kololo over noise pollution and flouting public health regulations.

Following an outcry by a section of city dwellers over noise pollution by some churches, bars, and discotheques, Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) has come out warning that soon operation will be launched to deal with the culprits.

KCCA Deputy Spokesperson Robert Kalumba told New Vision on Monday that the authority's enforcement officers had finalized plans to crack down on noise polluters.

"We are working nonstop to ensure that noise pollution is contained. As I speak our law enforcement teams are preparing an enforcement exercise on noise pollution," Kalumba said.

Asked about specific targets, Kalumba said: "Targets is everyone/body that's emitting noise."

In February last year, KCCA closed two bars in the upscale Kololo over noise pollution and flouting public health regulations.

In the same month, a veteran politician petitioned the High Court, seeking orders for the cancellation of Pastor Aloysius Bugingo's church license over noise pollution.

According to KCCA, the maximum permissible noise level for a place of worship in residential areas is 60 decibels during the day and 40 decibels at night.

A decibel is a unit of measurement used in determining the level of sound.

According to the National Environment Noise Standards and Control Regulations, 2003, no person is allowed to emit noise in the neighbourhood for more than two minutes in a residential area or noise control zone as determined by the local council.

A residential or noise control zone means a geographical area that encompasses hospitals, schools, residential houses and other institutions that require special considerations for noise control.

A person convicted of noise pollution is liable to a fine of not less than sh180,000 and not more than sh18m or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 18 months or both.

Below is a letter written to the New Vision by one of our readers about noise pollution

The propagation of noise in our places of residence has become a normal occurrence and one either has to adapt or run mad because there seems to be no end to the menace.

The mushrooming churches and bars have become a nuisance. The people we pay our taxes to create some kind of order are not different either.

One works hard and buys a plot of land, builds a house and before he even settles in, somebody else acquires the plot next door, puts iron shits together and starts a noise production factory disguised as a church.

If one cannot build without plans, why are churches allowed in our neighbourhoods in their semi-permanent structures?

Ugandans have been lamenting about these churches, but nothing is being done.

What kind of society is this that values chaos and hates order? Expecting the pastors to stop the noise without some form of enforcement or regulation is asking them too much.

They are also trying to survive and the more noise they make, the more the followers. The blame, therefore, is squarely on the Government.

The Government normally does not allow any kind of demonstration even when it is a right.

Their excuse is that even though it is one's right to demonstrate, you will not do that at the expense of the rights of others. Yes, whereas one has freedom of worship and of starting a bar business, why should they exercise their rights, while abusing the rights of others?

There are cases where a bar is on the left and the church is on the right.

However, it even becomes hard to tell which is which because of the noise from both places. Let authorities find a lasting solution to this problem or else the Government will build more mental hospitals.

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