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Witchcracft worries Mulago Hospital health workers

By Agnes Nantambi

Added 28th December 2019 09:49 AM

Majority of the children abandoned at Mulago Hospital suffer from sickle cells, pneumonia and cardiac problems among others

Witchcracft worries Mulago Hospital health workers

Majority of the children abandoned at Mulago Hospital suffer from sickle cells, pneumonia and cardiac problems among others

Health workers at Mulago National Referral Hospital have expressed concern over the increasing number of parents seeking divination for their sick children, instead of taking them to hospital.

According to Sister Alice Mukanza, the head of the children's ward at Mulago Hospital, the practice led to many children being rushed to hospital in critical condition or even dead.

"Many of these children are taken for witchcraft while in a manageable state, but while in the shrines, the situation worsens and they are sent away. By the time they bring the children to the hospital, they are in a poor state and end up dying," she explained.

Mukanza was speaking after receiving Christmas gifts from Apar Foundation.

"Some of these children suffer from diseases such as sickle cells, cardiac problems or pneumonia, but parents still fail to believe what their children are suffering from and end up taking them to shrines," she said.

She said they register cases of sick children being abandoned every day at the hospital by their parents, leaving the administration in confusion.

"Majority of the children abandoned at Mulago Hospital suffer from sickle cells, pneumonia and cardiac problems," she said.

Shaban Ssebuliba, the assistant customer care officer for Mulago Hospital applauded the director of Apar Foundation for helping the people in need.

"The gifts seem small, but they mean a lot to our patients. We receive patients in poor state with no one to help them. With this kind of support, such children feel their lives have been restored and it enhances quick recovery," Shanta Patel, the director of Apar Foundation said.

"I grew up seeing my father helping the needy and I became passionate about social causes. This instilled in me a sense of helping, which prompted me to start this foundation in remembrance of my father," she said.

She also called on well-wishers to join her in helping the needy so that they can realise their dreams. Patel said this is the third year they are giving back to the community.

She also called well-wishers to join her in helping the needy to make the country a better place for everyone to live in.

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