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Diabetes: Why you should not ignore routine eye check-ups

By Violet Nabatanzi

Added 12th December 2019 07:07 PM

Diabetic retinopathy is a diabetes complication that affects eyes. It's caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye also known as the retina.

Diabetes: Why you should not ignore routine eye check-ups

The senior consultant cataract and vitreoretinal surgeon Dr. Syed Asghar Hussin examining a man's eyes. PHOTO: Violet Nabatanzi

Diabetic retinopathy is a diabetes complication that affects eyes. It's caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye also known as the retina.

 
Routine visits to the doctors for eye checkups in diabetes patients could help prevent diabetic retinopathy conditions.
 
Diabetic retinopathy is a diabetes complication that affects eyes. It's caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye also known as the retina.
 
Dr. Syed Asghar Hussin, a senior consultant cataract and vitreoretinal surgeon at Dr. Agarwal's Eye Hospital said poorly controlled blood sugar is a risk factor.
 
Others are too many carbohydrates, fatty foods, lack of exercise are some of the major factors that lead to diabetes.
 
He added that diabetic retinopathy has no early warning sign but can be detected by blurry vision, sensitivity to light, poor night vision and flashes, and floaters.
 
Hussin advised the public that a 30 walk every day can reduce the risk of getting diabetes.
 
Experts say unhealthy lifestyles make their blood sugar levels rise above normal, putting them at increased risk of developing diabetes.
 
Diabetes is a basic systemic disease that affects children, adults, and adolescents when insulin secretion in the body gets affected. There are two types of diabetes is non-insulin dependent and insulin-dependent diabetes
 
Husiin cautioned the people diagnosed with diabetes should seek treatment in the first six months in order to avoid retinopathy diabetes.
 
World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that everyone should have an average of 150 minutes a week of physical activity, which will make one sweat for at least 20 minutes daily.
 
Experts say a diabetic patient is also more likely to develop several other eye conditions for instance cataracts, adding that having diabetes makes a patient two to five times to develop cataracts.
 
Having diabetes nearly doubles the risk of developing a type of glaucoma called open-angle glaucoma.
 
Diabetes is one of the four major non-communicable diseases (NCDs) others are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and chronic respiratory diseases.
 
 

 

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