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Buganda remembers 1966 attack on Lubiri

By Andrew Ssenyonga

Added 25th May 2018 03:49 PM

'The attack on the Lubiri was answering a political question militarily and 50 years later, we still see political and legal questions being answered militarily'

Buganda remembers 1966 attack on Lubiri

'The attack on the Lubiri was answering a political question militarily and 50 years later, we still see political and legal questions being answered militarily'

PIC: Buganda-Lubiri Guards; Mukama and Ddungu Joseph

BUGANDA HISTORY

ATTACK ON LUBIRI- Buganda Kingdom has marked the 52 years since soldiers attacked the Kabaka's palace at the orders of the then prime minister of Uganda, Milton Obote, triggering the 1966 crisis.

The attack, which the then president of Uganda Kabaka Edward Muteesa II escaped narrowly and fled into exile, marked the culmination of a power struggle with premier Obote over power and influence.

The aftermath was turbulent for the country as it introduced the use of the gun to solve political disputes.

"Political questions should be answered with political answers acceptable democratically. Legal questions should also be answered in court. When Milton Obote attacked Muteesa II, there was power struggle over what was Kabaka's role politically and undefined sharing of financial resources, which have not been resolved to date," Buganda premier Charles Peter Mayiga, said during a presser at Bulange Mengo on Thursday.

Mayiga added: "The attack on the Lubiri was answering a political question militarily and 50 years later, we still see political and legal questions being answered militarily".

He also told journalists that the attack caused a big setback on the kingdom, adding that federal system of governance can revive development in the kingdom and the country at large.

"It is the only vehicle to transform the kingdom," Mayiga said.

He noted that a federal system would complement government efforts and ensure there is rule of law so that areas such as education, health and conservation of natural resources are respected.

"Article 1 of the Constitution says power belongs to the people and the government derives its power from people's wishes, which it should always listen to," he said.

He urged all kingdom loyalists to stop mourning and work hard to revive the lost glory of the kingdom now that the Kabaka was restored.

 The attack was executed on orders of the then President Milton Obote, on May 24, 1966, forcing Muteesa into exile in London where he later passed on November 21, 1969.

 

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