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Publishers cry foul over piracy

By Nelson Kiva

Added 9th April 2018 10:54 AM

Piracy has persistently affected publishers for years. For instance, the Police reports revealed that in 2016, books worth over sh1.8b were confiscated by the Police.

Publishers cry foul over piracy

Piracy has persistently affected publishers for years. For instance, the Police reports revealed that in 2016, books worth over sh1.8b were confiscated by the Police.

PIC: The Police have got duplicated books in many bookshops in Kampala. (Credit: Hajara Nalwadda)

CRIME


KAMPALA - Book publishers have cried foul, calling for government-led copyright protection efforts as they count on millions of shillings in loses to piracy.

They alleged that over 60,000 title of books have been pirated, frustrating many publishers to the decision of quitting the business.  

Among the several confiscated counterfeit and substandard goods displayed by Interpol on Friday were the several copies of pirated books.

The director Interpol, Fred Yiga, told journalists at the directorate headquarters in Kololo, Kampala that it was time to protect brand owners from duplicators.

Piracy is the reproduction of books or other intellectual work by someone without the consent of the author or the owner.

The other items displayed included petroleum products, mattresses, electrical appliances, cosmetics, agricultural inputs, second hand undergarments and food and steel products.

The chairperson of Uganda Reproduction Rights Organisation (URRO), Charles Batambuzze, said the confiscated books were mainly of lower and upper primary.

Several of the books were discovered when the Police, together with officials from URRO raided a number book stores around Kampala.

Piracy has persistently affected publishers for years. For instance, the Police reports revealed that in 2016, books worth over sh1.8b were confiscated by the Police.

Batambuzze disclosed that the books were being reprinted at Nasser Road, calling the Police to intervene.

"Piracy is affecting publishers, many are quitting and it is these people who print and reproduce their books," he said.

The Police meanwhile met with the other stakeholders on Friday to discuss on how they could effectively eliminate substandard or counterfeit goods on the market.

The copyright law states that if someone so desires to reproduce or sell a book or work, they  need permission from the owner.

It is unlawful for anyone to sell, distribute, print or reproduce a book or work without permission from the owner.

Therefore, copyright violation is deemed both criminal and civil crime.


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