TOP
Friday,October 30,2020 17:08 PM

February 14: Valentine's or Ash Wednesday?

By Martin Kitubi

Added 12th February 2018 12:15 PM

The collision has drawn several questions for many believers, especially among Catholics, on whether to start with Lent period with fasting or to feast with their loved ones on Valentine’s Day.

February 14: Valentine's or Ash Wednesday?

The collision has drawn several questions for many believers, especially among Catholics, on whether to start with Lent period with fasting or to feast with their loved ones on Valentine’s Day.

PIC: Clearly, interests will be divided this February 14. This year, Valentine's Day has clashed with Ash Wednesday. (Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

LIFESTYLE


On February 14, Christians across the globe are eager to celebrate Ash Wednesday, and on the same day, people will commemorate, along with their loved ones, Valentine's Day.

However, this has not happened since the Second World War in 1945, with several scholars anticipating a repetition of the same in the years 2024 and 2029.

The collision has drawn several questions for many believers, especially among Catholics, on whether to start with Lent period with fasting or to feast with their loved ones on Valentine's Day.

Ash Wednesday is commemorated on a Wednesday, seven weeks to Easter Sunday and that means its mandatory day of fasting for Christians.
 
The day is characterised by one full meal and two small ones with a total ban on consumption of meat during the Lent Period.  

The Lent period is done to emulate Jesus Christ, who spent 40 days in the wilderness while fasting, endured all temptations by Satan, who are manifested in the Books of Matthew, Mark and Luke of the New Testament teaching.

Ash Wednesday is observed by many Western Christians, including Anglicans, Lutherans, Methodists, Presbyterians, Roman Catholics and some Baptists.

It  derives its name from the practice of blessing ashes made from palm branches blessed on the previous year's Palm Sunday and placing them on the heads of participants to the accompaniment of the words "Repent, and believe in the Gospel" or "Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return."

Unlike Catholics, non-Catholics will flock several hangouts with their loved ones to celebrate the Valentine's Day.

Day of romance

Valentine's Day, also dubbed the Saint Valentine's Day or the feast of Saint Valentine, is celebrated annually on February 14.

The celebrations started around the 14 Century as a Western Christian feast day honouring one or more early saints named Valentinus and it has become a globally a recognised ceremony with cultural, religious, and commercial celebration of romance.

It is characterised by offering gifts to the loved ones and often people wear red that means already in love for two people.

However, several other colours are worn, each with a given meaning or a message.
For instance, green means I am waiting, blue means Love applicants invited, Black mean proposal rejected, White meaning sorry, I am already reserved and orange, one is going to propose.

Others include pink which means proposal accepted, yellow for those who have broken-up, brown for broken hearts and purple or grey for those who are not interested in relationships.

Some catholic devotees say they will choose Church over fun
Paul Kamya a Catholic from Kamwokya said: "I will start my Lent with Fasting. God first, before anything."

He added that he will on Friday, take his mother, whom he has chosen for his valentine, for a date and surprise her with a gift.

And for Samalie Kazibwe, a Catholic and a trader in Kikuubo, a business centre in Kampala: "I love Jesus Christ for he has blessed me this long. I can only emulate him with endurance through fasting. I will fast on Valentine's Day."
 

Related articles

More From The Author

More From The Author