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Monday,September 28,2020 10:02 AM

Nurturing at an early age is nurturing a future career

By Ruth Nanfuka

Added 11th July 2017 12:34 PM

Discovering an artistic talent early enough can help you create a career for your child?

Nurturing at an early age is nurturing a future career

Discovering an artistic talent early enough can help you create a career for your child?

(Credit: Ruth Nanfuka)

ART & CAREER


"God is the greatest artist and the role of creation is his masterpiece," says James Kasule, a lecturer at Nkumba University.

He says art adds meaning to life and gives one a sense of belonging.

Having a bigger community of artists is a great opportunity to the world. Do you know that discovering an artistic talent early enough can help you create a career for your child?

Because as they grow, the art grows with them and eventually it is their area of expertise.

A renowned and one of the greatest artists of all time, Leonardo da Vinci, had no formal education yet his art still trends. When his father realized his talent, at the age of 15 he apprenticed him to his artistic uncle.

As a parent, pay great attention to your child's interest and know what to support them in.

 

Emmanuel Mugalu, a teacher at Namirembe Parents' Mixed Day and Boarding Primary and Nursery School, says art can effectively be nurtured with support from both parents and the school.

"All children are included in the extracurricular activities carried out at school, but once a child is discovered to have more interest in a particular activity, support is reinforced," he says.

But some children will not show much interest when the talent exists. It is that talent that is developed and eventually they gain interest, he adds.

Most people stereotype that art is for the disabled, but so many people earn a living from art, explains Kasule.

Art is a diverse subject and in a way everyone is entitled to a talent.

On his part, Mugalu notes that you can do numerous artistic activities like music, dance, drama, fashion, painting, craft and carpentry.

All these are paying and interesting.

"When you hear stories of most of the artists regardless of which kind of art, they all started when they were young; take for example musicians like Rema Namakula - she is a great singer but she started from school," explains Kasule.

 

Sarah Birabwa, a craft maker and seller at the National Theatre, says she grew up with her grandmother who did a lot of weaving things like mats, baskets and sweaters.

Her grandmother made sure that she learnt the skills she possessed.

Birabwa does not regret learning from her granny because she has been able to educate her four children as well as build a comfortable house with money earned from craft work.

However, she advises parents and teachers to balance both the formal education and the extracurricular activities.

She is also keen to stress that parents and guardians should not force children do what they don't want and instead teach them to love the art, By doing so, they will gain passion for it.

 

 

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