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Tuesday,August 11,2020 16:23 PM

It's off-season for coconuts

By Sauda Nabatanzi

Added 13th June 2017 02:45 PM

The coconut contains large amounts of water, the reason it is a vital component in many islanders' lives.

It's off-season for coconuts

The coconut contains large amounts of water, the reason it is a vital component in many islanders' lives.

(Credit: Sauda Nabatanzi)

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Coconuts have grown in popularity for their versatile uses ranging from food to cosmetics.

The fruit is most grown in tropical and sub-tropical countries as its trees easily establish in wet climate or on well-irrigated land.

Henry Sebuliba, an agronomist at Farming Consult & Management Co. (Facom) Uganda, says the conditions here in Uganda are not favorable for growing coconuts.

As such, most traders import them from the Kenyan coastal town of Mombasa.

The coconut contains large amounts of water, the reason it is a vital component in many islanders' lives.

For its water, some people buy it to take it as a drink or even mix it with other fruit juices for cocktails.

Felix Okot, a nutritionist in Kampala, says coconut water contains vitamins and minerals like calcium, iron and potassium; all which help to build the immune system of the body.

There are many ways of . . .

. . . using a coconut!

Besides its refreshing water, the white edible kernel of a coconut is used in various ways in culinary.

"My coconut cakes and cookies sell out; coconut is one of the most preferred ingredients here in my bakery," says Jacky Nankya, who owns a bakery in Bunga.

She says the kernel, once ground, can be added to other baking ingredients to make tasty delights.

Coconut oil is another product of coconut used for cooking, making hair products and body ointments.

Habiba Nabunya buys coconuts at Nakasero Market for sale to retailers and individual customers. She says the prices started going up about two months ago when the rainy season kicked off in Kenya.

"When it's rainy, the trees are slippery and farmers cannot climb up to pick the coconut. This strains the supply, hence the hike in prices."

Now that they are off-season, a small-sized coconut is at sh2, 500 while a big one is at sh3, 000 in most local markets.

 

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