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How the Kigandas deal with their cultural differences

By Vision Reporter

Added 12th August 2013 05:50 PM

David Kiganda, the senior pastor of Christianity Focus Centre and proprietor of Kingdom Radio, and his Zimbabwean-born wife, Pastor Cindy, wedded four months ago. While it was the first time down the aisle for Cindy, it was the second time for Kiganda who divorced his first wife seven years ago ove

How the Kigandas deal with their cultural differences

David Kiganda, the senior pastor of Christianity Focus Centre and proprietor of Kingdom Radio, and his Zimbabwean-born wife, Pastor Cindy, wedded four months ago. While it was the first time down the aisle for Cindy, it was the second time for Kiganda who divorced his first wife seven years ago ove

David Kiganda, the senior pastor of Christianity Focus Centre and proprietor of Kingdom Radio, and his Zimbabwean-born wife, Pastor Cindy, wedded four months ago. While it was the first time down the aisle for Cindy, it was the second time for Kiganda who divorced his first wife seven years ago over infidelity. The couple talked to Samuel Lutwama about their ever increasing love for each other
 
Kiganda says his love for Cindy increases everyday despite their cultural differences.   
 
The couple’s marriage began on a high note with two weddings. The first one was on April 6 at the Life Changing Ministries in Harere, Zimbabwe. Their second wedding came 20 days later in Uganda. It was presided over by Pastor Michael Kyazze of Omega Healing Centre, Namasuba.
 
Four months after their Zimbabwe wedding, a lot has happened and the couple confesses to enjoying every bit of their marriage.
 
Cindy
As a woman, it was a dream come true. I enjoyed both weddings and the support I received from both countries.
 
When I saw the video and my wedding photos, everything just came out perfectly well. The weddings were glamorous. It was a fairy tale.
 
During our first wedding, we travelled in beautiful cars that I only dreamt of while growing up; I was driven in Lincoln and the Bishop was driven in a Hummer stretcher H3, which was the latest on the market.
 
For the Ugandan wedding, the gown I wore was so beautiful. I really loved the Ugandan way of doing things from the time we arrived at the church, to our reception, up to the time we left for our brief honeymoon.
 
Everything went well in spite the few isolated cases of stress here and there.
 
Lots of excitement, few cultural shocks 
Although we were born and bred in different countries, our destinies were intertwined. Therefore, the cultural differences could not stop us from forging ahead.
 
One of them was that I had never seen nor used a pit-latrine, but I had to make adjustments to fit my new life.
 
My biggest challenge was preparing local Ugandan dishes, especially my husband’s favourite, which is matooke and groundnut sauce.
 
Then there was the language barrier with my mother-in-law and some members of our church who do not speak English.
I am trying to learn Luganda to fit in the Ugandan society, after all I am now half Ugandan by virtue of my marriage.

Settling in Uganda
Cindy says it has been easy for her to settle in Uganda because of the love and good reception she got from her husband’s family and church, the Christianity Focus Centre, where she is now a pastor. 
 
My husband’s five children have all proved to be my formidable allies and members of our church have all been receptive.
 
“Uganda is like my second home. I got so much support from church members, my in-laws and my loving husband. And for that, I thank God for being faithful to me in a foreign land.
 
“I believe God sent me into the life of Bishop Kiganda at this time to heal him of his emotional wounds and stand with him in his pastoral ministry. I have to take care of his appearance and his entire wellbeing as his wife,” Cindy says.
 
Cindy's calling as pastor
Looking at them seated side by side, after ministering at a lunch hour fellowship at Nakasero, Cindy looked calm. She had led the closing prayer, which was punctuated with spiritual references. 
 
Her hair was done up and her well-manicured nails and classy makeup spoke of someone who is conscious of her looks. She was also tastefully dressed and dignified in a manner that is befitting of a pastor’s wife.
 
If anyone had reservations about her pastoral calling, her narration would have convinced them of its authenticity.
 
 
Cindy’s calling
For four years, while I lived in South Africa, I had a recurring dream which foretold of my ministry calling. I would see myself ministering to people and they were getting blessed by my message. 
 
“I started attending pastoral training at our church at Christ Embassy in South Africa. At that time, the urge to serve God grew so strong in my heart that I enrolled for leadership training. It was during one of the leadership conferences that I met David.
 
“He sensed my calling and encouraged me to pursue it at a deeper level. So as our love for each other deepened, so did my spiritual calling,” says Cindy.
 
Therefore, Cindy did not just become a pastor because she married a pastor.
 
Cindy says hosting the 18th Annual Ministers Conference, under the theme Where is your Brother, has been the highlight of her four month old marriage and ministry.
 
“I was at the centre of it all, hosting people from all walks of life. Everything was so demanding, but I thank God it turned out to be a perfect conference and I had the feel of what it means to host a perfect conference,” she says.
 

Four months of married life
For Cindy, marriage is a whole new experience, while Kiganda believes that love is like fine wine, it gets better with age and experience.

 
“I would not say my first marriage led to this, but my love is like fine wine that gets better as time passes on. My marriage with Cindy is becoming better every day that passes,” Kiganda says.
 
Cindy describes herself as a happily-married woman.
 
“The marriage is so far so good, perhaps because I got married to someone who had become my best friend, spiritual mentor and boss.
 
“The reason I call him my best friend is because I share everything with him. We pray together and, as my husband, he desires good things for me and I also desire good things for him.
 
“I call him my mentor because even before we got married, he encouraged me in my spiritual walk.
 
“And lastly, I call him my boss because of what the Bible says in the book of Ephesians 5: 22-23, “Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands as unto the Lord.  For the husband is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head if the church; as he is the saviour of the body.”
 
Cindy says it is important for wives to respect their husbands as the heads of the family.
 
She explains that most women are failing to accept their positions in marriage, yet once someone accepts to get married, it makes that person to accept serving under the authority of that person.
 
Genesis 2:18 stipulates that women were given to their husbands as helpers. A husband is the male partner in marriage, but he is the master, which makes him the boss in the house.
 
Men will always fight with those who would like to challenge their position in marriage.
 
She urges that if wives adhered to the biblical principles of submission, then marriage would be a sweet and wonderful experience.
 
“But once wives challenge the headship of their husbands, there will be no beauty in marriage because husbands will be seeing  fighters, challenging the status quo.”
 
Kiganda on marriage
Kiganda gives a spiritual insight about marriage, saying it is like a beautiful house set on a hill before the public. He explains that in essence, love is the door to marriage.
 
However, he adds that love, which is the door to marriage, has to be nurtured and watered by both the people involved. 
 
“As believers, we put God first in everything we do and for that reason we handle every challenge in the way that God expects us to,” Kiganda says with deep conviction.
 

How the Kigandas deal with their cultural differences

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