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Wednesday,November 25,2020 08:49 AM

Religion VS office policies

By Vision Reporter

Added 23rd May 2010 03:00 AM

RELIGION is a personal issue and most people are very sensitive about it.
Some people follow the norms and values of the religion that they would be ready do anything to uphold them.

RELIGION is a personal issue and most people are very sensitive about it.
Some people follow the norms and values of the religion that they would be ready do anything to uphold them.

By Godwin Ayesiga

RELIGION is a personal issue and most people are very sensitive about it.
Some people follow the norms and values of the religion that they would be ready do anything to uphold them.

However, when it comes to work, one may need to reconcile those strong beliefs with workplace policies.
Otherwise, an employee’s religious beliefs and practices will conflict with their job requirements.

David Miller, the author of “God at Work” says the ‘70s addressed women’s needs, the ‘80s were about family-friendly policies, the ‘90s on sexual orientation, but today the big question is religion.

Joshua Okello, an accountant with a micro-finance organisation in Kamwokya, says his former boss once asked him to forge accounts figures to show that the company had achieved its annual target. He refused and resigned to avoid compromising his christian values.

Okello is not alone. Simon Kwesiga is a Seventh Day Adventist secondary school teacher in Kampala.

Although his day of worship is Saturday, the school teaching timetable does not accommodate his belief.
Incidentally, employees with strong religious beliefs and honesty, experience difficulties when they are faced with the wishes of unhonest employers.

This not only affects their performance, but also the quality of their work.
Albert Kakama, the human resource and administration manager at Uganda Management Institute, says it is important for employers to respect religions and norms to a level that does not interfere with interests of the organisation.

He adds that while individuals join organisations with personal interests, it is vital for one to study the policies of the institution before accepting the job.

He argues that most formal organisations have policies that outline what is expected of employees to harmonise the interests of the employer and the workers.

Kakama advises job-seekers to first find out if the company is involved in activities that might compromise their religious beliefs before they take up any job offer.

He adds that it is better for such employees to find jobs where they would have freedom to exercise their faith.

Employees need to read and understand the policies of an organisation because they are designed to conform to labour and other laws and norms, Kakama explains.

Wilber Karugahe, a psychology lecturer at Bugema University, says employers should never ignore the religious needs of employees.

He argues that the need for reconciling religious beliefs at the workplace depends on whether the worker considers his or her religious beliefs as more important than the job.

He adds that one should make sure that their religious values are reconciled with those at the workplace regardless of the situation they may find themselves.

Jane Kwebiha, a human resource expert, observes that when one’s religious beliefs and workplace responsibilities conflict, it is upon the employee to determine what he or she will do to keep a clear conscience.

Kwebiha argues that if you are asked to do a task that conflicts with your values, you should discuss it with the boss and let them know that you cannot do it.

She, however, says you need to give a genuine reason for refusing the assignment.

Kakama advises that before you take on your boss, you need to be sure about the company’s policy on religion.

Religion VS office policies

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