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Learn World Cup terminologies unique to South Africa

By Vision Reporter

Added 25th June 2010 03:00 AM

A vuvuzela, sometimes called a "lepatata" (its Setswana name) or a stadium horn, is approximately one metre in length, commonly blown by fans at football matches in South Africa. It is also used in Mexico, Brazil and Israel.

A vuvuzela, sometimes called a "lepatata" (its Setswana name) or a stadium horn, is approximately one metre in length, commonly blown by fans at football matches in South Africa. It is also used in Mexico, Brazil and Israel.

Vuvuzela
A vuvuzela, sometimes called a "lepatata" (its Setswana name) or a stadium horn, is approximately one metre in length, commonly blown by fans at football matches in South Africa. It is also used in Mexico, Brazil and Israel.

The origin of the name is disputed. It may originate from the Zulu for "making noise," from the "vuvu" sound it makes, or from township slang related to the word for "shower."

Originally made out of tin, the vuvuzela became popular in South Africa in the 1990s. They require some lip and lung strength to blow and emit a sound like a deep foghorn or an elephant.

Vuvuzelas have been controversial and have sometimes been banned from stadia. Critics say the instruments are blown haphazardly, which can be distracting to players and coaches who are trying to pay attention to the game.

Diski
The South African World Cup dance, set to get the world jiving to an African rhythm. South Africa has a totally different way of playing soccer. It can be rhythmic, sometimes bordering on being showy, but certainly never boring.

Every move has a unique name, what is more, there is a different name for the same move, in different parts of the country. This is not surprising because South Africa has 11 official languages – including sign! Names include Chester and Tsamaya.

Makarapa
From a hard hat to one of South African football’s most enduring icons, the history of the makarapa is as colourful as its inventor and the team colours they are decorated with. Along with the Vuvuzela, it has come to epitomise the vibrant spirit of South African football.

The Makarapa was originally made in 1979, for a match where two local teams were playing. For people in the cheap seats, fights often break out. A man who worked on a construction site, made himself a hard hat to protect himself against missiles.

Then he made it colourful, transforming it into a celebration of his team colours and logo. Soon, almost everyone wanted to wear a makarapa to matches.

Fans would often buy them right off his head. The man gave up his job, established a small workshop in his shack, and supplied a steady stream of customers with his unique creations.

From its humble beginnings with the original team colours of black and yellow, his magic touch has expanded to include a wide range of sports memorabilia.

Jabulani
The official FIFA World Cup 2010 ball made by Adidas, Jabulani was developed at Loughborough University in the UK, and is manufactured in China, using natural Kerala latex bladders from India, thermoplastic polyurethane-elastomer from Taiwan, ethylene vinyl acetate, isotropic polyester/cotton fabric, glue, and ink from China.

Jabulani means "rejoice" in Zulu. The ball’s new design consists of eight thermally bonded, three-dimensional panels. The surface of the ball is textured with grooves, a technology developed by Adidas called Grip′nGroove intended to improve the ball's aerodynamics.

Learn World Cup terminologies unique to South Africa

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