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Monday,September 28,2020 02:30 AM

What farmers say

By Vision Reporter

Added 16th August 2010 03:00 AM

Where can I buy a jump planter?
EDITOR — Thank you very much for the update on agriculture techniques. In last week’s issue on Page 30, there was an article about the jump starter, but you forgot to tell us where someone can get it.

Where can I buy a jump planter?
EDITOR — Thank you very much for the update on agriculture techniques. In last week’s issue on Page 30, there was an article about the jump starter, but you forgot to tell us where someone can get it.

FARMERS' FORUM,/big>

Where can I buy a jump planter?
EDITOR — Thank you very much for the update on agriculture techniques. In last week’s issue on Page 30, there was an article about the jump starter, but you forgot to tell us where someone can get it. I ask you to indicate the contacts of the sellers so that those of us who are interested can contact them. I urgently need it, please help me. Thank you.

Ronald.
Tel 0782548990


EDITOR — I have read about the jump planter, which I think is welcome news to our farming community.
However, the problem is that you have not told us where to get the planter from. I would be glad to know where such planters can be bought. Thank you.

Sam Bikangaga
Principal Economist, MTTI


We need your addresses

EDITOR — Thank you for rebranding your newspaper. The content is also detailed although it lacked the addresses of your writers such as Godwin Ayesiga and Stella Nassuna.
I think it would do the readers good to have the writers’ contacts for future reference.

I am very interested in vegetable farming and have gone ahead to research on the viable options in Uganda.
My only worry is that I do not know anyone or any farm from which I can get information.

Would you please recommend some successful medium-sized farms that I can visit for first-hand information?

Boniface


FROM THE EDITOR — One jump planter costs sh100,000 at Makerere University Agriculture village, Kabanyolo and from well established farm machinery dealers. In response to farmers’ requests, Harvest Money will soon have a special section where farmers and sector service providers can market their products and services at a small fee. This is part of Harvest Money’s mission to keep the farmer informed. You can contact the editor on 0703-749176.

Teso farmers need a fruit processing plant

EDITOR — I have on several occasions wondered why, in spite of Teso region’s potential for fruit production, there is no fruit processing factory in the area.

As a result, tonnes of mangoes and oranges go to waste every season. This has discouraged many farmers from taking up fruit farming.

Since the President has been advising farmers to add value to their produce, the Government should show the way by setting up a fruit processing plant in Teso region.

This will encourage more farmers to take up fruit farming on a commercial scale. Fruit farming might yet prove to be the engine for Teso’s development.

Susan Ekemu,
Serere


Prepare for the dry season

EDITOR — Two years ago, we experienced a long dry spell in Gomba, when it was still part of Mpigi district. The drought left many animals dead and the Government had to step in with food aid to stop people from starving to death.
The following year, we received a lot of rain leading to a bumper harvest.


The water dams in areas like Kisozi were filled up so our cattle had enough water. But now the dry spell is back this year. While the Government takes part of the blame for ‘not learning’ from the previous drought, we, as farmers, have also not done our part.

We need to construct more watering dams, acquire simple irrigation systems and store some food from the previous harvests. Otherwise, if the dry spell continues into September, we are doomed.

Isaac Ssejjaka,
Maddu


Give us more details

EDITOR — Thank you for the good work you are doing to help out farmers and those who plan to venture into the enterprise. My only disappointment is you told us about a vital tool, such as the jump planter, but you did not tell us where it can be bought.

If you think you are giving the sellers free advertising, I suggest you invite the shops that are mentioned in the story to contribute towards advertising so that our lives are made easier. Secondly, cover crops were written about in your newspaper recently.

So, I would like to know where I can buy the Arachis Pintoi seeds. I want to plant them in my orchard to provide ground cover in addition to being eaten by the chicken and pigs.

A few months ago, your paper also wrote about improved pigeon peas but you did not advise us on where we can buy them.

I request agricultural organisations to have websites or offices where they can get in touch with farmers and advise them on things like seeds and animal feeds.

We are trying to establish a permaculture farm but other than buying the seeds from Namanve, the rest of the process is so painstaking because we do not know where to get inputs.

Is it possible for Harvest Money to compile for us a list of farm tools, where we can get them and the cost? Your assistance in this matter will be highly appreciated.

Joanne,
Kampala


Investors, where are you?
EDITOR— As a vegetable farmer, I am very disappointed with our so-called investors who have failed to manufacture the relevant products that we can use in farming. For example, we need plastic products like plant pots and crates for carrying horticultural products.

However, when you go to supermarkets, like Shoprite and Game, the plant pots you find there are from South Africa while the crates are from Kenya. Perhaps because they are imported, they are overpriced.
Why can’t our manufacturers make these products locally? Shame on them.

Arthur Nkutu
Iganga

Learn to use fertilisers
Editor — It has become imperative for any farmer who hopes to earn from their sweat, to adopt better farming practices like applying fertilisers. I recently read in The New Vision that fertilisers improve farm produce by 30%.

While most farmers are put off by the high price of fertilisers, I have discovered that the extra cost incurred is easily re-couped through higher yields.

We need to realise that as a country whose economy relies heavily on agriculture, we have to adopt modern farming technology, if we are to survive in the increasingly competitive global market.

While many farmers are keen to adopt new technology like irrigation, they do not know where to start or where to get the money to finance it. That is why the Government must step in and help us to get this technology and other inputs at a subsidised fee.

Jaberi Mulwana,
Masaka



What farmers say

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