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Potholes shock Namibian delegation

By Vision Reporter

Added 25th October 2010 03:00 AM

A Namibian delegation that is in the country to acquaint itself with Uganda’s decentralisation system has expressed shock at the potholes on city roads and the poor garbage management.

A Namibian delegation that is in the country to acquaint itself with Uganda’s decentralisation system has expressed shock at the potholes on city roads and the poor garbage management.

By Jackie Nambogga

A Namibian delegation that is in the country to acquaint itself with Uganda’s decentralisation system has expressed shock at the potholes on city roads and the poor garbage management.

“Potholes are hearsay in our capital Windhoek and the entire country, but we were surprised that the roads in Uganda’s capital are impassable. I wonder what kind of roads are in the rural areas,” remarked Erastus Negonga, the permanent secretary in the Ministry of Regional and Local Government, Housing and Rural Development.

He said much as Namibia is only 20 years old as an independent country, it has been rated one of Africa’s cleanest countries.

According to Negonga, in Namibia, potholes could lead to the recall of the area parliamentary representative.

The 13-man team led by Kahijoro Kahuurre, the permanent secretary from the Ministry of Health and Social Services, was meeting technocrats from Jinja district and municipal council at the municipal chambers on Thursday.

Kahijoro said they were undertaking a study on how decentralisation is taking place in Uganda and its challenges.

He also said they had come to find out how health services had been taken to the grassroots.

Francis Barabanawe, the Jinja municipal town clerk, told the delegation that decentralisation had brought services closer to the communities and empowered them to make follow-ups of government projects.

“Almost everybody participates in the planning process and people decide on what they want. This has promoted a sense of ownership among the communities,” Barabanawe said.

He added that the system had also promoted transparency and reduced corruption.

Barabanawe, however, noted that 65% of Jinja’s budget was funded by the central government, which is a constraint under decentralisation.

However, Dr. Steven Banonya, the Jinja municipality health officer, told the delegation that funding of health services was still a challenge in Uganda.

He said the expenditure per person is $10, while Namibia’s, according to Negonga, is $700.

Banonya said much as health centres have been established up to parish level, they are not equipped with drugs, which affects service delivery.

Potholes shock Namibian delegation

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