TOP
Wednesday,September 30,2020 07:02 AM
  • Home
  • Health
  • Hibiscus: Not just for scenic pleasure

Hibiscus: Not just for scenic pleasure

By Vision Reporter

Added 29th November 2010 03:00 AM

THE hibiscus plant that many grow to beautify their compounds, has found its way into homes as a herbal remedy. The plant has many varieties, but the one used a herb is the hibiscus sabdariffa, commonly referred to as Roselle.

THE hibiscus plant that many grow to beautify their compounds, has found its way into homes as a herbal remedy. The plant has many varieties, but the one used a herb is the hibiscus sabdariffa, commonly referred to as Roselle.

By Agnes Kyotalengerire

THE hibiscus plant that many grow to beautify their compounds, has found its way into homes as a herbal remedy. The plant has many varieties, but the one used a herb is the hibiscus sabdariffa, commonly referred to as Roselle.

Moses Ssenoga, a naturopathic doctor working with Mukago Herbal Sanitarium in Mbuya, says although the plant is a common sight in people’s homes, many are ignorant about its health benefits.

Ssenoga says hibiscus is a remedy for ailments and is a food ingredient. Many times people, especially children, stop at sucking nectar out of the fruit, but dried hibiscus is edible and can be used as an ingredient for tea.

Tamara Nyobi, a nutritionist, says boiled hibiscus is more valuable than conventional tea. “Hibiscus tea has a distinctive, vibrant and natural colour. It is caffeine free, rich in Vitamin C, has a smooth, pleasant fragrance and is delicious,” he explains.

Benefits
Hibiscus tea lowers high blood pressure. “It contains antioxidants that help reduce the build-up of fatty deposits in arteries and reduces blood cholesterol level (fats in the blood) therefore, reducing risks of heart diseases,” Ssenoga says.

Nyombi says hibiscus tea contains mild laxatives and if taken regularly, helps relieve constipation and prevents gall bladder infections.

She says its high levels of potassium help maintain fluid volumes in the body .

People with liver problems are encouraged to take hibiscus tea without adding sugar since hibiscus is a natural diuretic.

Ssenoga says hibiscus tea contains an enzyme inhibitor which blocks the production of amylase, an enzyme that breaks down complex sugars and starch.

He affirms that drinking a cup of hibiscus tea an hour before a meals helps reduce the absorption of dietary carbohydrates and aids weight loss.

The Vitamin C content in hibiscus is a remedy for a cold and infections. It also helps strengthen the immune system.

Hibiscus: Not just for scenic pleasure

Related articles

More From The Author

More From The Author