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A fusion of ballet, African moves

By Vision Reporter

Added 26th March 2009 03:00 AM

IT was the first concert by this group under their new name; UGANDA National Contemporary Ballet. The former name, Burudani Dance Company, had been misinterpreted.The show, held at the National Theatre on Sunday, was meant to correct that impression.

IT was the first concert by this group under their new name; UGANDA National Contemporary Ballet. The former name, Burudani Dance Company, had been misinterpreted.The show, held at the National Theatre on Sunday, was meant to correct that impression.

By Emmanuel Ssejjengo

IT was the first concert by this group under their new name; UGANDA National Contemporary Ballet. The former name, Burudani Dance Company, had been misinterpreted.The show, held at the National Theatre on Sunday, was meant to correct that impression.

There were four dance pieces; three new and one presented for the second time in as many months. The duet Our Way Of Life Is Klling us, was first presented during the Dance Week in February.

Patrick Kaddu and Valerie Miquel, brought two different dance styles together. Kaddu’s dance movements were in line with African contemporary dance, unveiling a story about human conflict in slow movements. Miquel was a cross between contemporary dance and ballet.

The Magical World of Technologie, featuring a child dancer, was the simplest dance of the evening. The story of how technology kills interpersonal relations was shocking. for an audience that could be counted as being well versed with current technology.

The 30-minute duet, Wo/men WHY? by Miquel and Isaac Mulumba was the most serious piece. It tackled domestic violence with gruesome pictures.
That was only one interpretation and great dance calls for several interpretations.

The Bench, although dealing with the serious matter of different characters meeting, had hilarious moments as the dancers fought for space on a bench.

The presidential advisor on media, who is the group’s patron, John Nagenda,in his intoductory remarks expreessed worrythat the Ugandans in the audience were few. The rest were foreigners.

A fusion of ballet, African moves

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