TOP
Friday,September 25,2020 01:30 AM

How to face an appraisal

By Vision Reporter

Added 28th April 2009 03:00 AM

IT is nearly appraisal time. And for many of us, this is the time when we begin to shiver. Appraisals are like school reports. Trying to improve just before the deadline will not fool your supervisor but how you face them could earn you a higher mark.

IT is nearly appraisal time. And for many of us, this is the time when we begin to shiver. Appraisals are like school reports. Trying to improve just before the deadline will not fool your supervisor but how you face them could earn you a higher mark.

By Mathias Safari

IT is nearly appraisal time. And for many of us, this is the time when we begin to shiver. Appraisals are like school reports. Trying to improve just before the deadline will not fool your supervisor but how you face them could earn you a higher mark.
Here is how:

Preparation

Lack of preparation is the greatest factor behind the low scores in many appraisals, according to Peter Kirunda, a senior personnel officer at the Ministry of Public Service.

He says the basic principle is to perform well throughout the year, but when time has run out, you should look at your last review notes, and gather any “well-done” emails from suppliers, clients or co-workers as back-up.

Cover all aspects of the career

You can request for training to gain more experience, even when you plan to take this knowledge elsewhere, later. Robert Kwesiga, the deputy headteacher at Muntuyera High School Kitunga, says ample time should be spent discusssing future performances.

Create the right
atmosphere

The ideal situation is when the worker and the appraiser meet and discuss freely throughout the appraisal period in a quiet place. Experts say an employee should feel free to seek clarification.

Criticism

Many of us become negative when our appraisers talk about what we do not wish to hear.

However, in an online article, “Human Resource Management,” by Michael Armstrong, an evaluator will be more impressed when one is willing to learn and improve, than pretending to know it all. Armstrong is a human resource management professor.

Do not prioritise money

Dickens Kagarura, a lecturer of management principles at Makerere University, says your supervisor feels impressed when you separate money issues from personal development.

Stay focused

It is so tempting to get bogged down by an issue at your workplace. Everything cannot be addressed on a crash programme. So if your appraiser makes a comment or two, do not insist on the subject.

Be specific

And for the appraiser, the indicators should be based on the acronym SMART — specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and tangible: “Everything must be clear enough for your employee. The appraisal process should be free of rhetoric,” says Bossa Lutalo, a lecturer of management science at Kyambogo University.

How to face an appraisal

Related articles

More From The Author

More From The Author