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Wednesday,December 02,2020 06:20 AM

Dairy farmers fight drought

By Vision Reporter

Added 23rd August 2009 03:00 AM

DAIRY farmers in western Uganda have resorted to the construction of private valley dams after a long drought that has led to milk shortage.

DAIRY farmers in western Uganda have resorted to the construction of private valley dams after a long drought that has led to milk shortage.

By Jude Kafuuma

DAIRY farmers in western Uganda have resorted to the construction of private valley dams after a long drought that has led to milk shortage.

Over 112 valley dams have so far been constructed in Kiruhura district.

The drought has left several animals dead and others malnourished.

Farmers from Rushere, Akatongole, Kateete, Nyakasarara, Lwamasa and Nsweere dairy farms trek long distances to draw water from the few shallow swamps and dams that have survived the dry spell.

In Kenshunga and Kinoni counties, the Government constructed two water valley dams to supply the farms.

They, however, remained dry because they were shallow.

Counties like Kazo, Kashongi, Kanyanyeru and Rwemikoma have not received any assistance to avert the situation.

“This is a big set back to the dairy farmers. We decided to combine efforts and construct valley dams to save the situation and prepare for the future,” said Lawrence Muwanga, the treasurer of the Uganda National Diary Traders Association.

Some farmers have received loans totalling sh100m to construct valley dams, he said.

Rushere Savings and Credit Union recently released sh50m towards the cause.

Katwe Fresh Diary, one of the leading suppliers of milk in Kampala, is one of the diary firms that have greatly been affected by the drought.

The firm collected 20,000 litres daily before the drought, but this has reduced to 500.

The trucks that take milk to Kampala and other major towns in the country return to Kiruhura with water for the cows.

“We take 3,000 litres of water for the cows but people end up using some of it because they cannot take dirty water from ponds,” Muwanga said.

“This is a big challenge and if the situation continues, we might have to give up the trade,” he added.

Dairy farmers fight drought

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