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Thursday,August 13,2020 23:44 PM

Kikaaya teaches self-reliance

By Vision Reporter

Added 15th September 2009 03:00 AM

HIS friends and colleagues nicknamed him the poor carpenter. They discouraged and belittled him, but this did not prevent him from pursuing his dream.

HIS friends and colleagues nicknamed him the poor carpenter. They discouraged and belittled him, but this did not prevent him from pursuing his dream.

By Juliet Waiswa and Juliet Lukwago

HIS friends and colleagues nicknamed him the poor carpenter. They discouraged and belittled him, but this did not prevent him from pursuing his dream.

As a secondary school student, John Kalule opted to train in carpentry. He is now a student of industrial art and design at Nkumba University and employed at Kikaaya Vocational School in Bulenga.

He trains students of Kikaaya and uses the available resources in the institution to develop his carpentry skills. For his effort and contribution, he receives an income and support from the school management.
Charles Mubiru, the principal of Kikaaya Vocational School, says there are various benefits of joining the institution. It can be a leeway to getting a job or being self-employed.

Mubiru says: “The programmes are robust and flexible. Courses offered include business studies, motor-vehicle mechanics, woodwork, tailoring, nursery teaching, hairdressing, home management and economics.”

If a student fails to continue with the O’level or A’level programme, they can continue pursuing the vocational course as the next best alternative. The underlying factor is that the skills may guarantee one a job. Other people have been able to open workshops of their own. Infact, only a few are willing to become coaches at these institutions.

The issue for most people is striking the balance. For instance, how to enroll for a course in art and design, when you are a fulltime student. You can consider doing the course during the holiday. Some institutions offer one or two month courses.

Kikaaya Vocational School was started in 2000 and is open to everybody, irrespective of the level of education attained. Through a joint partnership with the Portsmouth Grammar School in the UK, the institution will link students for different study programmes.

Fionah Nicholson, a representative from The Portsmouth Grammar school, says the aim of the partnership is to exchange knowledge and skills among the schools.

The institution receives national and international support from Uganda Private Vocational Institution, Vision for Africa, Nsambya Home Care, Kids in Need, World Vision Uganda and Japan International Cooperation Agency.

Kikaaya teaches self-reliance

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