TOP
Wednesday,October 21,2020 23:47 PM

Corridors of power

By Vision Reporter

Added 5th October 2009 03:00 AM

Lukwago riles Seya
KAMPALA mayor Nasser Ntege Sebaggala is a man known to be “cumbersome” in English (meaning well-versed, in his own version). In his impeccable command of English, he used his knowledge to describe one of the main critics

Lukwago riles Seya
KAMPALA mayor Nasser Ntege Sebaggala is a man known to be “cumbersome” in English (meaning well-versed, in his own version). In his impeccable command of English, he used his knowledge to describe one of the main critics

Lukwago riles Seya
KAMPALA mayor Nasser Ntege Sebaggala is a man known to be “cumbersome” in English (meaning well-versed, in his own version). In his impeccable command of English, he used his knowledge to describe one of the main critics of his administration in no kind words. During a phone-in programme on one of the city’s radio stations, a caller confronted him with an opinion offered by Kampala MP Erias Lukwago (Central). He asked the mayor what the law says about the management of Kampala markets. Without mincing his words, Sebaggala answered: “You mean Erias Lukwago? That one is just a laughing stone, don’t mind about him”. Mr Mayor, did you mean laughing stock?

‘Pulling’ is fantastic
MP Simon Oyet is not amused by the traditional Ganda practice of extending their women’s external private parts, locally known as “visiting the bush” or “pulling”. During a workshop on the female genital mutilation Bill in Entebbe recently, he took issue with the practice, saying if FGM is to be banned, “pulling” among Baganda should also be outlawed. When asked to elaborate, he said: “This common practice of—is it pulling or extending their parts?” But before he could finish Gomba Mp Rosemary Najjemba took him on: “Be very careful, leave our stuff alone. Have you heard anybody complaining? It doesn’t injure any body part. For us our men enjoy them.” The audience roared with laughter.

MUK PRO goofs

Makerere University’s public relations officer, Gilbert Kadilo is known to be a friendly man. But he lost his cool when he was pushed against the wall by some UBC journalists who were pestering him for a comment on Parliament’s recommendation that Makerere styles up in regard to tuition and administration. Kadilo, who was about to enter his car, fired back on national TV: “Why doesn’t Parliament come and administer Makerere?” he entered his car and sped off. Good public relations indeed!

Alaso’s analysis

Debating the passing of the budget for teaching patriotism in schools recently, Soroti Woman MP Alice Alaso said there was no need to teach patriotism since it can only be manifested in the spirit of sacrifice for one’s country. She said there is no such spirit in Uganda. “How can you have two State Houses, two presidential jets and two presidential country homes all funded by the tax- payers?” she asked.

Corridors of power

Related articles

More From The Author

More From The Author