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Corridors of power

By Vision Reporter

Added 9th September 2007 03:00 AM

Kuteesa’s humour
FOREIGN affairs minister Sam Kuteesa is a man of many faces with a spontaneous sense of humour. Fielding questions from journalists at a recent Commonwealth Summit press briefing at the ministry head offices, he was quick to dismiss talk of an alleged walk-out by the Op

Kuteesa’s humour
FOREIGN affairs minister Sam Kuteesa is a man of many faces with a spontaneous sense of humour. Fielding questions from journalists at a recent Commonwealth Summit press briefing at the ministry head offices, he was quick to dismiss talk of an alleged walk-out by the Op

Kuteesa’s humour
FOREIGN affairs minister Sam Kuteesa is a man of many faces with a spontaneous sense of humour. Fielding questions from journalists at a recent Commonwealth Summit press briefing at the ministry head offices, he was quick to dismiss talk of an alleged walk-out by the Opposition, bitter over an additional sh153b. This, he did with style. “Who says there was a walk-out by the Opposition? The Opposition is not jittery at all! But you should know that Parliament is a free place and people are free to go where they want. Some of them could have been going to ease themselves and it was mistaken for a walk-out!” he said, sending all and sundry into laughter.

Kayunga’s version
Prof Simba Sali Kayunga of Makerere University has a unique way of gauging the strength of political parties in the country. The Political Science don is not convinced that the number of votes garnered by various political parties at the last elections is indicative of the respective party’s strength. While the NRM enjoys enormous popularity and, therefore, regarded as the most powerful, Kayunga thinks otherwise. “If the NRM was subjected to what it has subjected the other parties to over the last 20 years, the NRM would not be there. It is not driven by faith like other parties,” he said at a recent workshop, drawing unanimous approval from delegates.

Puzzled Nasasira
The words “by end of October” have become synonymous with the Commonwealth Meeting projects. The words are so common that it intrigued works minister John Nasasira. “I wonder why everyone is saying they hope to have completed by the end of October. I hope it is not becoming like the Year 2000,” he said, triggering laughter, adding: “but I hope that you mean what you say.”

Optimistic Bosa
Much as Prof Lutalo Bosa, the Vice-Chancellor of Kyambogo, is embattled with a number of people hitting at him from different directions, he does not seem bothered. He is confident that there is still a bright day ahead of him. Last week, during an exclusive interview with The New Vision, he spoke with utmost conviction about his resourcefulness, despite his readiness to leave. “Some of these people around me think I have hit a dead end. No, that is a mistake. There is still a lot that I can contribute to this nation,” he confirmed. Adieu Bosa!

Corridors of power

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