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Plan International changes face of Kamuli schools

By Vision Reporter

Added 24th October 2007 03:00 AM

THE ecstatic pupils march through Kamuli streets led by Kamuli Brass Band. For some, it is the military goose-march. Others simply do the kadodi (Gishu circumcision dance), while raising a thick cloud of dust. By the time they return to the school, many are dripping with sweat.

THE ecstatic pupils march through Kamuli streets led by Kamuli Brass Band. For some, it is the military goose-march. Others simply do the kadodi (Gishu circumcision dance), while raising a thick cloud of dust. By the time they return to the school, many are dripping with sweat.

By George Bita

THE ecstatic pupils march through Kamuli streets led by Kamuli Brass Band. For some, it is the military goose-march. Others simply do the kadodi (Gishu circumcision dance), while raising a thick cloud of dust. By the time they return to the school, many are dripping with sweat.

Their excitement increases when visitors begin arriving at the school in sleek cars. The pupils of Kamuli Township Primary School are celebrating the completion of a 10-classroom double-storey block and the guests are here to commission the building.

William Zaake, the headmaster, says each of the classrooms accommodates 320 pupils.

“The building was constructed using funds donated by the people of Germany, through Plan International, a non-governmental organisation,” Zaake says.

He says the donation was timely since four out of the six classroom blocks at the school had been declared dangerous due to old age.

The school, built in 1939 by N.K. Metha, is the biggest UPE School in Kamuli district with a population of 2,165 pupils and 37 teachers.

“When authorities stopped pupils from using the old classroom blocks, we remained with only four blocks constructed using funds from the School Facilitation Grant.

With Plan International’s assistance, we have 10 more classrooms, 12 flush toilets and two pit latrines,” he adds.

Hasifa Nambi, the Plan International community development facillitator, said the NGO injected sh640m into the project.

“We had two projects, a classroom complex at Kamuli Township and a dining hall at Kamuli Girls’ School. Both projects cost about sh1b,” Nambi said.

She said the NGO had similar projects at Busota, Buzibira, Kananage, Kiwolera and Butabala villages and improved health centres at Nawaningi and Kitayunjwa.

Nambi said the projects at Kamuli Township Primary School and Kamuli Girls Primary School kicked off in December 2006 and had been completed on time.

Patrick Bungu, the headmaster of Kamuli Girls Primary School, said through Plan’s efforts, the school had a conducive learning environment.

“Such help is essential since the Government cannot do everything on its own,” Bungu said.
He said in addition to the dining hall, the NGO had built a fence at the school, which controls the pupils’ movements.

“The fence ensures adequate protection for pupils and the school property,” he adds.

Rebecca Kadaga, the district Woman MP, hailed Plan International, saying it has greatly changed the face of Kamuli.

Kadaga, also Deputy Speaker of Parliament, urged the beneficiaries to use the facilities effectively.

“Let all the facilities be treated like personal property. That is the best way to maintain them,” Kadaga said.

Winnie Kitimbo, a pupil, said: “With the help of Plan International, we are bound to become responsible citizens. Just be ready for more Kadagas and Namirembe Bitamazires.”

She said the NGO had set a challenge for the schools to produce better grades.

Donal Keane, Plan’s country director, said they had an arrangement to uplift the standard of girls to bring them to the same footing as the boys since the girls spend more time doing domestic chores.

Plan International changes face of Kamuli schools

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