TOP
Wednesday,June 03,2020 04:40 AM
  • Home
  • Archive
  • Is our music industry at the brink of collapse?

Is our music industry at the brink of collapse?

By Vision Reporter

Added 27th August 2009 03:00 AM

I have ardently followed the developments in our music industry over the years drawing comparisons between the golden day’s musicians and today’s upcoming artists.

I have ardently followed the developments in our music industry over the years drawing comparisons between the golden day’s musicians and today’s upcoming artists.

By Nathan Were

I have ardently followed the developments in our music industry over the years drawing comparisons between the golden day’s musicians and today’s upcoming artists.

Despite the increased creativity and innovation in the industry, the quality of music has continued to deteriorate over the years.

Music is not only about the tunes and rhythm but the relevancy and meaning that comes with these tunes.

Unlike in the 1980s and early 1990s when music used to convey lasting messages, today’s music is a one-off excitement.

This is the reason why a new song becomes a hit today but fades from the scene the next day. An example is Zigi Dee’s popular song Eno Mic.

At the time of its release, the song swept across the country like a bushfire and it was a popular request on local FM stations almost everyday. Another popular hit was Dr. Hilderman’s Double Bed Mazongoto. These and many more have since faded off the music scene.

Today, if you listened to Afrigo Band’s Mpe’ddembe, Olumbe Lwo’bwavu, Sirina, Tony and other songs, you may think these songs were released just yesterday.

Kadongo Kamu artiste, Paul Kafeero’s music is still popular among Ugandans and will be for many more years to come.

Unlike in the past, today’s music messages are not sustainable and do not stimulate interest for long-term listenership. This is why popular songs fade off the music scene faster than expected.

The music in the 1980s carried strong educative messages. Musicians then put in a lot of time to research and come out with songs that would play beyond their current generation.

That is why songs by artistes like Philly Bongole Lutaya (RIP) still live on. His albums continue to sell, and his music continues to be recycled by other musicians.

The current trend in Uganda’s music industry can, in part, be attributed to absence of clear standards to guide the selection of which music to play on radio and television stations.

Local radio and television stations play a critical role in shaping the future of the country’s music industry.

These set the trend for the kind of music that should play and in a way shape the listenership in the same direction.

Though some people will argue that the times have changed and each generation resurfaces with its own style, for music it is a different story. Music whose message is relevant lives on and transcends generations remaining new and fresh in the minds of the people.

This explains why the popular 1980s and 1990s music is still adored today. It may also be possible to argue that the current popular hits such as Radio and weasel’s Bread and Butter, Bobi Wines Mazzi Mawanvu and others may not be as popular and exciting as they are now 20 years to come.
The music profession has been identified as one of the most rewarding professions in Uganda.

Artistes today, unlike in the past, have built mansions and drive posh cars. This may, however, not be sustainable considering the shape and direction the music industry is taking.

Afrigo Band can still perform for audiences playing the same songs it played 20 years ago and many will pay to attend the show which may not be the case for some of our current artistes 20 years to come.

The media has a critical role to play in revamping our music industry. Local FM and television stations need to set standards.

As consumers of music, we have the power to change the trend our music is taking. Let us advocate music that will shape behaviour and character of generations beyond our own.

The writer is a business development and research officer at Equity Bank

Send a topical opinion with your picture to guestwriter@newvision.co.ug. We take 600 words only

Is our music industry at the brink of collapse?

Related articles

More From The Author

More From The Author