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Tuesday,September 29,2020 20:57 PM

Less culture on Francophone Day

By Vision Reporter

Added 23rd March 2008 03:00 AM

CHANGES, challenges and unity were what made the Francophone Day celebrations at Ndere Centre on March 15 revered. The day kicked off on a rather low note, with a debate on whether the French language is still necessary in today’s world.

CHANGES, challenges and unity were what made the Francophone Day celebrations at Ndere Centre on March 15 revered. The day kicked off on a rather low note, with a debate on whether the French language is still necessary in today’s world.

By Emmanuel Ssejjengo

CHANGES, challenges and unity were what made the Francophone Day celebrations at Ndere Centre on March 15 revered. The day kicked off on a rather low note, with a debate on whether the French language is still necessary in today’s world.

But that the debate turned out to be a water-versus-fire argument meant that the language was under no threat. In the preceding quiz, there were no surprises. UPDF came last.

An army competing with institutions that revere French like Alliance Francaise, Makerere and Kyambogo universities, would only take first place if questions were not so much about French culture, but ammunition.

And when the Francophiliacs left the auditorium to the exhibition area, there were more lessons to learn. A number of Francophone countries were represented in an exhibition that was less about French culinary dishes. It centred on traditional dishes from the various countries.

For a reason hard to point out, the Democratic Republic of Congo stall was the busiest, with many lining up until the food run out.

The Algerians were very courteous to the end and provided staff to explain to people about the various dishes. The absence of Rwanda was conspicuous. Going by prejudices, you would have expected more French wine.

But it was Belgian beer that was more visible. Only that the idea of selling non-refundable coupons even when the items run out left some dissatisfied.
The evening ended with music performances that kicked off with a children’s choir.

However, most of the artists, especially Ndere Troupe members, were downcast. News of the death of playwright, director and actor Winkle Rutamirike had just sipped in.

Less culture on Francophone Day

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