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Hired spokesmen know nothing about families they represent

By Vision Reporter

Added 1st May 2008 03:00 AM

TODAY, both the girl’s and boy’s families hire spokesmen during the introduction ceremony. Lawrence Owori, a spokesman, says many of the spokesmen know nothing about the families they represent. He adds that others even speak foul language, which is a a taboo.

TODAY, both the girl’s and boy’s families hire spokesmen during the introduction ceremony. Lawrence Owori, a spokesman, says many of the spokesmen know nothing about the families they represent. He adds that others even speak foul language, which is a a taboo.

By Jude Katende

TODAY, both the girl’s and boy’s families hire spokesmen during the introduction ceremony. Lawrence Owori, a spokesman, says many of the spokesmen know nothing about the families they represent. He adds that others even speak foul language, which is a a taboo.

Amos Nkungwa, a resident of Kamwokya adds that some people even take fruits with seeds like pumpkins and water melons, to their in-laws, which is a taboo.

Nkungwa says the ceremony has lost the respect it commanded traditionally. “These days a senga dances around her in-laws while looking for the suitor. This is disrespectful. The issue of ‘fines’ is also wrong. How can you fine your in-laws?” he asks.

Eng. Michael Sebusolo, a spokesman, complains that: “Some of the in-laws even turn up shabbily dressed and with funny hairstyles.”

Sebusolo attributes the changes to cultural dynamism. “Intermarriages, education and exposure to foreign culture have led to the changes. For instance, kwanjula has turned into some sort of engagement party. But getting engaged is a Western thing.”

Owori also says the changes are inevitable because of the influence of religion and inter-tribal relationships. “Today, it is acceptable for a Muteso to marry a Muganda girl.

When that happens you would not expect the man to respect Kiganda culture. More so, born-again Christian men take soda instead of local beer.”

James Kambugu, who has been a spokesman for 18 years, says: “Things are changing globally so we adjust accordingly.”

Kasolo Serunyiigo says these days kwanjula has turned into a show off where the bride-to-be changes into several clothes. “Everytime the lady appears from the house, she wears something different. This is expensive.”

Sebusolo decries the fact that the whole function has now been commercialised. “There is a lot of showing off, especially among young ones. Some people have even turned kwanjula into a gathering for friends and family.

They even hire sengas. This is wrong, the function has totally lost meaning,” Sebusolo says.

Hired spokesmen know nothing about families they represent

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