TOP
Wednesday,September 30,2020 22:18 PM
  • Home
  • Health
  • New Vision finds solution to thematic curriculum

New Vision finds solution to thematic curriculum

By Vision Reporter

Added 2nd July 2007 03:00 AM

THE New Vision has discovered that the use of Newspapers in Education is a solution to the thematic curriculum approach. As recommended by the Government, the thematic approach requires teachers to use the child’s everyday experiences in teaching, rather than the subject method.

THE New Vision has discovered that the use of Newspapers in Education is a solution to the thematic curriculum approach. As recommended by the Government, the thematic approach requires teachers to use the child’s everyday experiences in teaching, rather than the subject method.

By Jovita Ajuna
in Manafwa


THE New Vision has discovered that the use of Newspapers in Education is a solution to the thematic curriculum approach. As recommended by the Government, the thematic approach requires teachers to use the child’s everyday experiences in teaching, rather than the subject method.

This was unveiled when The New Vision held a Newspaper in Education workshop for headteachers at Bubulo Mixed Primary School, Bubulo sub-county headquarters in Manafwa district last week.
NiE is a project aimed at training teachers to improve the literacy and numeric skills of their students through the use of newspapers.

The teachers were excited as they used markers, glue and scissors in the exercise aimed at rejuvenating interactive classroom instruction. The over 200 teachers were divided into groups, each with a leader to present the results to the participants. The reporting was done in Lumasaba — a local language. This was done because the thematic curriculum in lower levels recommends use of a local dialect. It was a typical classroom atmosphere, with pupils making noise, some trying to demonstrate they understood the instructions more than others.

The district education officer, Patrick Mabuya, promised to include the NiE project on the education budget. This was after he realised that newspapers are a good teaching aid for teachers.

“Our reading culture is very poor and this answers many questions why our districts have been performing poorly in the national examinations. We can only improve if we promote reading among our pupils,” Mabuya said. “This workshop has given me the ground to seek a vote from the district council to promote reading in the district. I hope The New Vision will be in position to avail the papers and products to facilitate the underfunded education sector.”
The workshop was opened by Michael Wekalawo, the district secretary for finance, on behalf of Charles Walimbwa, the district chairman.

“We are grateful that you have thought about us. Many a time, we wonder where such activities take place when we read about them in the newspapers,” said Wekalawo.
The New Vision’s NiE manager, Emmanuel Ngerageze, told the participants that teachers need to be permanent students if they are to improve the lives of their pupils.

“A teacher should always be willing to learn something new everyday for thr good of his pupils,” Ngerageze said.
“With a big class, it is hard to teach efficiently. Divide pupils in groups to make them fully participate in the lesson.”

Manafwa district has over 130 primary schools and over 1,700 teachers. Despite the poor reading culture, Wekalawo was optimistic that their district would be on the map if the participants demonstrated what they learnt and passed on the information to others.

“A good learner must always pass on the information to others for the betterment of the future and deliver what they have learnt,” he told the participants.

For headteacher training, Contact engerageze@newvision.co.ug or call 0772466867

New Vision finds solution to thematic curriculum

Related articles

More From The Author

More From The Author