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Meet the Gardner: Even palm trees can do well in pots

By Vision Reporter

Added 3rd March 2006 03:00 AM

PALM trees are one of theeasy-to-plant-and-
manage trees that should not miss in a
home. Because of their ornamental beauty that compliments any home, if grown along walkways, they will give your home that exceptionally cool look, says Betty Mayanja, a gardener and compound designer in Nagul

PALM trees are one of theeasy-to-plant-and-
manage trees that should not miss in a
home. Because of their ornamental beauty that compliments any home, if grown along walkways, they will give your home that exceptionally cool look, says Betty Mayanja, a gardener and compound designer in Nagul

By Harriet Birungi

PALM trees are one of the easy-to-plant-and-
manage trees that should not miss in a
home. Because of their ornamental beauty that compliments any home, if grown along walkways, they will give your home that exceptionally cool look, says Betty Mayanja, a gardener and compound designer in Nagulu, Kampala.

“The way their leaves spread out and how they naturally-remind you when to prune by drying some of the leaves and consequently falling off, makes them stand out. Although they can be placed anywhere, to make an impact, they are better planted in the front of the house,” advises Mayanja.

However, for people residing in confined places, their palm trees can best be planted in pots where they can be shifted in case a new plant needs to be planted.

All that one has to do, is choose the right size of the container so that the roots can easily develop without causing damage to the container. Alternatively, they can be placed in a bucket prior to being planted in the pot that contains saw-dust. Saw-dust absorbs any excess water that could lead to pot breaking.

“For strong and durable pots, one can either acquire them in different shapes and sizes at a fee between sh5,000 and sh30,000 or have the permanent in-built pots which are in vogue,” she adds.

“For the container palm trees, I usually uproot them, cut off the wild growing roots, change the soil and replant,” Mayanja says. Changing the soil provides the tree with fresh nutrients and an opportunity for the roots to keep in one place.

However, if you would rather not disturb the root system, supplement the soil with liquid manure. The easy-to-absorb liquid manure is a mixture of chicken dung or dropping, rainwater and vitamins as those used to treat cough in humans.

“After mixing all these ingredients, I leave it to ferment for six months so that the dung is mature and in residue form. Then I apply it by spraying so that it is evenly spread,” she explains.

Meet the Gardner: Even palm trees can do well in pots

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