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The secret behind blowing 100 candles

By Vision Reporter

Added 20th July 2006 03:00 AM

IN a country where life expectancy is 45 years, living to be 50 is chance; making 100 is a blessing. So when he celebrated his 100th birthday last weekend, Mzee Zerubabel Kasule felt blessed.

IN a country where life expectancy is 45 years, living to be 50 is chance; making 100 is a blessing. So when he celebrated his 100th birthday last weekend, Mzee Zerubabel Kasule felt blessed.

By Stephen Ssenkaaba

IN a country where life expectancy is 45 years, living to be 50 is chance; making 100 is a blessing. So when he celebrated his 100th birthday last weekend, Mzee Zerubabel Kasule felt blessed.

At a thanksgiving service at St. Peter’s Church Lugoba, Kazo in Kawempe Divison, the old man bellowed, “Who am I to live up to this day?” Who am I to be seated here today before such a large crowd? It is all God’s glory; thanks be to the Almighty.”

At 100 years old, Kasule’s memory is amazing. The way he effortlessly mentioned the names of people and places, events and the years was admirable.
“You may be old, but you are young at heart; your memory is great,” remarked Namirembe diocese Bishop Samuel Ssekadde

As he spoke, his face lit up with joy. He later led the congregation in a song Erinnya Lya Yesu Ddungi (How sweet the name of Jesus sounds), kneeling before Bishop Ssekadde who handed him a certificate of recognition.

Surrounding him him were his family — five daughters, grandchildren and great grandchildren, and a congregation of relatives, friends and well-wishers who had come to celebrate a man whose contributions to his community will define his legacy.

A trained teacher and preacher with over 50 years experience, Mzee Kasule has tirelessly promoted education and Christianity. In 1933 he helped establish Police children’s school Nsambya where he taught for 29 years. In 1935 he helped revive Kazo church of Uganda, which had collapsed after the death of its caretaker.

“Just 2 to 3 Christians used to attend every Sunday; we used to collect sh1 or 50 cents at every collection.”

After over 40 years of service, Kasule was appointed to start a new church in Nkere in 1977 where he also was the preacher.

Two years later he established another church at Lugoba, Kazo, which now hosts two Services every Sunday.

As a teacher, Mzee Kasule established one of the first private schools in 1950. Muganzi Lwaza Memorial School in Kazo in Kawempe Division is still thriving.

Mzee Kasule is an exemplary leader and father whose marriage to the late Nora Nabweteme produced 11 children, five of whom are alive.

Born in 1906, to the late Yosia Mukasa Kasule, a preacher and Dulunkansi Mulisa Mundu Mbugeramula, Kasule Kiwanuka Nnaku Musana Twegoky’omu is the sole survivor of seven children. He attended Kaagaanga Sub Grade School in Bulemezi, Mengo Central School. “We used to pay sh24 as school fees each year, that is sh8 per term,” he recalls.

Due to lack of school fees he missed a place at Budo King’s School (Kings College Budo), which he had qualified to join.
He continued his education at Kampala normal school where he took a teaching course.
He qualified as a teacher and went on to teach in various schools including Kasawo Model School, Bukalasa Agricultural College.

The secret behind blowing 100 candles

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