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Masekela arrives

By Vision Reporter

Added 2nd September 2006 03:00 AM

SOUTH African music maestro Hugh Masekela, who jetted into the country yesterday for a fundraising concert for disabled children, has described himself as an African musician, not a jazz icon.

SOUTH African music maestro Hugh Masekela, who jetted into the country yesterday for a fundraising concert for disabled children, has described himself as an African musician, not a jazz icon.

By James Odomel

SOUTH African music maestro Hugh Masekela, who jetted into the country yesterday for a fundraising concert for disabled children, has described himself as an African musician, not a jazz icon.

He will be performing today at the newly-completed and picturesque Kampala Serena Hotel.

“We play category music which is African music, not jazz,” he said, adding that the word ‘jazz’ was associated with wierdly sensual Black American music in the 1960s.

“I must say we are honoured to be here for the first time. I used to just hear about Uganda through friends but now am happy to be here,” he said.

Masekela also said if he is invited for the second show in Uganda, he would be happy to come back.
“I will accept the second invitation if I am to be approached. This time, I think it should be a bigger venue like a stadium,” he added.

He said he was overwhelmed when on landing at Entebbe, some revellers asked him whether he had more tickets for the show.
The tickets had ran out by Thursday.

Born near Johannesburg in 1939, Masekela boasts a four-decade music career, spanning from his first love jazz and pop to RnB, polished by a number of performances and bewitching skills on the saxophone. He also plays other instruments.

The New Vision, South African Airways (SAA), Uganda Society for the Disabled Children (USDC), and telecommunications firm MTN joined hands to sponsor the maiden trip.

Individual tickets had been going for sh50,000, while a 10-seat corporate table costs sh3m.

MTN publicist Tina Byaruhanga said all proceeds from the concert will be given to USDC, a local NGO that looks after disabled children in Uganda.

USDC provides medical and social rehabilitation to children with disabilities.

The South African trumpeter is best known for his 1968 feel-good worldwide smash hit, Grazin’ In The Grass. His 1987 hit Bring Him Back Home became the anthem for Nelson Mandela’s world tour following his release in 1992 after 27 years in prison.

Masekela arrives

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