TOP
Friday,June 05,2020 17:02 PM

Generations meet at German art exhibition

By Vision Reporter

Added 31st March 2005 03:00 AM

THE beauty of having different artists from different generations, jointly exhibiting their work, is that it presents a rich collection not just of work, but also of ideas. And while none of these may be extraordinary, the uniqueness of style and ideas of each individual artist gives a new outlook t

THE beauty of having different artists from different generations, jointly exhibiting their work, is that it presents a rich collection not just of work, but also of ideas. And while none of these may be extraordinary, the uniqueness of style and ideas of each individual artist gives a new outlook t

By Stephen Ssenkaaba

THE beauty of having different artists from different generations, jointly exhibiting their work, is that it presents a rich collection not just of work, but also of ideas. And while none of these may be extraordinary, the uniqueness of style and ideas of each individual artist gives a new outlook to the work.

The Uganda German Cultural Society in Ntinda is currently hosting one such exhibition, in an attempt to reconcile old school craftsmanship with new blood enthusiasm. The exhibition features Dr George Kyeyune, Paulo Akiiki and Francis Xavier Ifee. It will run until the end of this month.

Dr Kyeyune endears us to his work with his hazy palette. His work is woven around a liberal approach that pays attention neither to line nor form.

His images depict thick glazes of brushwork, which gradually fade into the canvass, living behind a few sparkling hues. At some points, his images appear obscure, almost impossible to figure out. Yet in this kind of obscurity, Kyeyune’s work derives meaning and character.

His hazy pallet denotes the uncertainty of life, the challenges of living for just another day, just like it is in Uganda. His themes are accordingly tailored towards the daily activities in a typical African setting. From the bodaboda phenomenon to the daily tribulations of a housewife, Dr Kyeyune’s work puts life in a truly Ugandan perspective.

Even though he has not produced any new work for this exhibition, Paulo Akiiki’s images still capture attention. This perhaps has to do with his canny manipulation of bright and dull colours to obtain a neutral, well balanced palette. His well controlled hues run across the canvass in rhythmic patterns enhanced by the dark to light technique.

His themes are well articulated through vivid and expressive images of women undertaking the daily chores, life in the village and culture.

Ifee’s work is a typical representation of African art fused with a contemporary style. His work presents a rich colour scheme pampered with intricate geometric patterns. Ifee uses highly creative images to explore the world of a woman and the issues which surround humanity.

For all their different styles, the three artists bring us together through their work.

Generations meet at German art exhibition

Related articles

More From The Author

More From The Author