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Thursday,September 17,2020 17:11 PM

Congolese hits grace Belgian King Day

By Vision Reporter

Added 21st November 2002 03:00 AM

Who said the white man cannot dance to Lingala music? You should have been at the Belgian Embassy on the evening of last Friday during the 63rd anniversary of the Belgian King Day

Who said the white man cannot dance to Lingala music? You should have been at the Belgian Embassy on the evening of last Friday during the 63rd anniversary of the Belgian King Day

By Raphael Okello and Denis Jjuuko

Who said the white man cannot dance to Lingala music? You should have been at the Belgian Embassy on the evening of last Friday during the 63rd anniversary of the Belgian King Day. It was the Congolese Lingala oldies that made the day.

High profile guests and the Ugandan Belgian community merrily milled around the beautifully illuminated terrace gardens. They eagerly sampled the cheese and drinks that overflowed at the terrace. The evening was great but it was destined for remarkable things yet.

From the twilight, in the flowery gardens, below the crowded terrace, the Touch Band was a spark of magic. Supplying Congolese classic oldies from the 60s, originally performed by legends of Lingala music, this option of songs for a Belgian anniversary, at first seemed of peculiar taste.

The Band, comprising of popular Ugandan and local Congolese musicians assembled an appealing synchronised performance that overwhelmed the Belgians and the guests.

Playing a string of songs— Tambola Na-Mokili by late Jean Bokelo, formerly of Orchestra Conga Success; Ngali by orchestra Les Kamale, Mado by late Franco among other oldies— the band irresistibly took centre stage.

Ibrahim Fidel, band-leader, played the lead guitar. Manicho deftly plucked the bass guitar. The guitar was laid bare in the arms of the giant Amigo Wawawa. His charming vocals echoed in the gardens and beyond. Giles Warugaba played the drums as if it was his last performance. Godfrey Lubuulwa would have strangled anyone suggesting he should stop playing the keyboard. You should have seen him. You would believe it.

MC, dancer and vocalist, pulled off rough and wicked but captivating dance gimmicks. The Belgian audience agreed. A great number peered in awe. A few could not help but let his dance moves take a toll on them. Their attempts to imitate MC’s complicated movements were lame, but brave and admirable. You would wonder who colonised the other!

Congolese hits grace Belgian King Day

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