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Klear Kuts sings for the soul

By Vision Reporter

Added 19th July 2001 03:00 AM

Klear Kut, JB, Papito, Navio, Mith and Langman, the rap group together with their 11-track project represent renewed hope that the endangered music genre might finally get the respect and attention it deserves from the community.

Klear Kut, JB, Papito, Navio, Mith and Langman, the rap group together with their 11-track project represent renewed hope that the endangered music genre might finally get the respect and attention it deserves from the community.

By Sebidde Kiryowa Klear Kut, JB, Papito, Navio, Mith and Langman, the rap group together with their 11-track project represent renewed hope that the endangered music genre might finally get the respect and attention it deserves from the community. They first caught our attention with the release of their Steve Jean-produced single Nothin' Wrong Wit' A Lil' Dope. The typically urban/hip-hop track, however, did not make much of an impact beyond occasional appearances on Sanyu FM. But Klear Kut had made their mark nonetheless and that stint had marked their advent. Urban gospel group First Love noticed the teeming talent of the boys and invited them for some collaboration. Klear Kut features on First Love's CD on three tracks: Say Yes, Say No, Wijje Owa Yesu and Sirina. Their dope rhymes dropped with the tastiest of flavours undoubtedly bring to these gospel songs just the right urban tinge they need to appeal to their target audience-today's urban non-christian youth. Consequently, Klear Kut were part of all First Love's concerts around the city. They were the highlight of First Love's Asante launch on Christmas Eve last year at Kampala Pentecostal Church (KPC). All this helped throw them into the media spotlight. When they figured they had attained enough popularity to stake out on their own, Klear Kut decided it was time they did an album of their own. They teamed up with DnD, one of Uganda's best hip-hop production teams. The album is expected at the end of July 2001. "We basically split the album into three parts. The mind part brings a nostalgic feeling to its sombre tracks. There is also the mental sub version. Plain hip hop. Not just the beats but stuff you've got to sit and listen to," explains Navio. "When we talk about the body, it's all about the beats-the bumping tracks. The soul is constituted in songs that are spiritual. Songs that show respect for God," adds Langman. Any message the boys were trying to pass on to us? "The mind, body and soul is the trinity of human existence. Plain and Simple," says Navio, on a final note. The five members decided to form a group after realising that they had what it takes to progress in the musical realm. After free-styling in Kampala's Sabrina's Pub and DV8, Klear Kut's first break was winning DV8's talent competition for 2000. Ends

Klear Kuts sings for the soul

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