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Wednesday,September 23,2020 08:53 AM

Bududa revives bullfights

By Vision Reporter

Added 9th August 2011 03:00 AM

RESIDENTS and local leaders of Bududa district have urged the Government to set up a modern tourist attraction centre at Bulucheke grounds where bullfights are held.

RESIDENTS and local leaders of Bududa district have urged the Government to set up a modern tourist attraction centre at Bulucheke grounds where bullfights are held.

By Paul Watala

RESIDENTS and local leaders of Bududa district have urged the Government to set up a modern tourist attraction centre at Bulucheke grounds where bullfights are held.

The move is aimed at enabling the district generate revenue from the fights.

They said bullfights are part of the Bamasaaba’s cultural heritage that has been in existence since 1963, but have not yet been recognised as a tourist attraction.

Constant Matuha, the chairperson of the bullfighting association, said farmers under zero-grazing train their bulls how to fight when they are three years and use cows as bait for the bulls to fight over.

“Several people flock to the district to watch the bulls fight at no cost. They are held every fortnight,” Matuha said.

Last Saturday, several people assembled at the arena in Namasho village, Bulucheke sub-county with their animals.

The spectators carried containers of local brew which they drank while watching the bulls fighting.

The spectators also danced to Lumasaba songs as others drummed.

Young men and elderly women were warned to keep away from the battleground that was filled with animals.

The elders prayed to their gods before the fight started as a symbol of respect to the forefathers who initiated the sport. After the fight, people drunk alcohol and ate roast matooke and meat.

“People from different countries like Kenya also cross through Lwakhakha border point to come and watch the bullfights,” Matuha said.

Over 40 bulls took part in the fight on Saturday.

The sport of bullfighting started in Spain in the 1720s and spread to South America, then later to France in the 19th century.

In those countries, religious festivities and royal weddings were celebrated by bullfights.

These, however, involved strong men fighting furious bulls and in some cases, the animals would injure or kill the men and vice versa.

Matuha said the bulls are well trained and weigh between 500kg and 800kg.

He said the bull that emerges the strongest is named after the strongest leaders in the world and its owner receives a prize.

Matuha said the bulls can be a danger to their owners and could destroy the place where they are kept should they remain idle for over two weeks.

The fights improve their appetite, build their necks and chests, and help them work off excess energy, thus stopping them from being destructive and hostile.

Bududa revives bullfights

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