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Thursday,October 29,2020 17:26 PM

A display of variety

By Vision Reporter

Added 25th September 2011 03:00 AM

AS it prepares for Independence Day celebrations, Nommo Gallery glitters with some interesting artworks. Nothing new for those who have been around the art scene, really.

AS it prepares for Independence Day celebrations, Nommo Gallery glitters with some interesting artworks. Nothing new for those who have been around the art scene, really.

By Stephen Ssenkaaba

AS it prepares for Independence Day celebrations, Nommo Gallery glitters with some interesting artworks. Nothing new for those who have been around the art scene, really.

But still, something for the curious eyes to feed on. What is it that Collin Sekajugo says with his vibrant, nearly violent palate of reds and yellows? This man loves to experiment; his painting facing the entrance is an experiment gone too far I think. I see a human figure in there and then it blurs on.

Sekajugo takes expression to dizzying heights. Perhaps for a good reason because not all the work on display here bounces with as much life. Look at Japheth Kiyingi’s fiber mosaic entitled Pot Dancers hanging on the wall on the right wing of the gallery.

You see mundane monochromes depicting two figures balancing pots on the heads, but which does not say much beyond the rich texture and distinct patterns. But you also have life in a different sort of style – subtle, yet powerful as in Maria Naita’s I have a song - a portrait of a woman washed up in earthy brown hues with a bit of red.

The calmness on her face, the little tiny red lips are careful pointers to Naita’s knack for drawing the viewer’s attention to the beauty of woman.

And yes, women feature quite prominently in this exhibition that I understand showcases randomly picked pieces. Apart from Juuko’s impressive, albeit cluttered impressionist depiction of a town scene, Ronald Kyaligonza’s scenic green landscape and Joshua Ipoot’s green maze of lines among a few others; various artists here dedicate much of their creative abilities to exploring the woman’s body and life.

This is especially more evident in Gwoktoch’s lovely faces, Kasi Byamugisha’s ‘she took the lead’, Carol Acan’s ‘more than a woman’ and so many others.

A display of variety

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