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Women call for strong employment protection policies

By Jeff Andrew Lule, Lucy Kiiza

Added 2nd August 2019 07:48 PM

This was during a national dialogue on economic empowerment of young women in Uganda; at Imperial Royale hotel in Kampala.

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Former Chairperson of the Uganda Women Entrepreneurs Tereza Mbire (2nd left) shares a moment with young women during a National dialogue on economic empowerment of young women at Imperial Royale hotel in Kampala. Photo by Abou Kisige

This was during a national dialogue on economic empowerment of young women in Uganda; at Imperial Royale hotel in Kampala.

 

EMPLOYMENT PROTECTION

KAMPALA - Young women have asked the Government to come up with strong employment policies and laws to protect them from exploitation at workplaces.

The young women were presenting their challenges within the employment and education sector.

They noted that women have been left at the mercy of their employers, and continue to be sexually harassed.

This was during a national dialogue on economic empowerment of young women in Uganda; at Imperial Royale hotel in Kampala. 

The event was organized on Wednesday by Plan International in partnership with Uganda Women Entrepreneurs Association Limited (UWEAL) and Restless Development among others.

Rebecca Karagwa, from UWEAL, said the government needs to ensure that all employers have policies to protect women.

“Many women continue to be sexually harassed by their supervisors and cannot talk about it because they fear to lose their jobs. We need to strengthen the systems at all levels where women can report these issues and actions are taken without favour,” she noted.

Daniela Kagina said many women remain harassed in silence because they have no job security where they work.

She noted that the majority of the women work in the private and informal sector, where they have no security for their security.

“Those employed in the informal sector are not given appointment letters thus leaving them exposed. As a result, some employers take advantage and many women give in to protect their jobs,” she added.

 

 he ountry irector of lan nternational  ganda reg avender listening to young ladies during during a ational dialogue on economic empowerment of young women at mperial oyale hotel in ampala hoto by bou isige The Country Director of Plan International Uganda, Greg Lavender listening to young ladies during during a National dialogue on economic empowerment of young women at Imperial Royale hotel in Kampala. Photo by Abou Kisige

 

Lydia Musekerwa, representing people with albinism, said many people employ albinos and later use them for other intentions, because of the beliefs and myths they have.

“Some have a belief that when they sleep with albinos their businesses will shrive,” she said.

She added that the government needs to support people with albinism as a special group to start their own income-generating activities as a protection measure.

Douglas Opio from the Employers’ Federation attributed the problem to a limited inspection of workplaces at the district level.

However, he noted that all victims can report their cases to the labour district office in their respective districts.

“Even ignorance is a big problem. Many workers do not know their rights and cannot demand what they do not know,” he said.

Joan Nataamba, from the Platform for Labour Action, said the government needs to ensure that stringent policies are in place to ensure all women are protected.

“Most private institutions do not give contracts to their workers to sign which is a challenge to women,” she added.

The country director Plan International, Grey Lavender commended the government of Uganda for its continued support towards girls and young women to lift their economic status.

Lavender said young women in Uganda still face challenges hindering their opportunities for economic and social development, saying there is a need for national strategies by various stakeholders to end the problem.

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