TOP
  • Home
  • News
  • Bigirimana takes over Judiciary

Bigirimana takes over Judiciary

By David Lumu

Added 26th July 2019 03:12 PM

According to sources, the single file reshuffle takes immediate effect and Bigirimna is expected to take charge of Judiciary, starting Monday next week.

Bigirimanainsert 703x422

According to sources, the single file reshuffle takes immediate effect and Bigirimna is expected to take charge of Judiciary, starting Monday next week.

JUDICIARY

KAMPALA - President Yoweri Museveni has replaced the Permanent Secretary of the Judiciary, Kagole Kivumbi with Pius Bigirimana, the Ministry of Gender Permanent Secretary.

According to sources, the single file reshuffle takes immediate effect and Bigirimna is expected to take charge of Judiciary, starting Monday next week.

It is not clear who will replace Bigirimana at the gender ministry.

Sources have told Saturday Vision that Museveni has sent Bigirimana to the judiciary to “sort out the mess”, which has saddled the organ in recent times.

Saturday Vision has leant that Kivumbi has been sent on forced leave, pending a wide range of investigations related to his work within the Judiciary.

Efforts to talk to both Kivumbi and Bigirimana were futile, but sources say, the presidential directive that Bigirimana takes over the judiciary indicates a new focus, especially at a time when Chief Justice Bart Katureebe is set to retire.

“It is a big assignment for Bigirimana, and his sole job is to clean up the mess within the judiciary,” a source told Saturday Vision.

Of late the judiciary has been in the limelight for a string of accountability related allegations, including the questionable procurement deals.

MPs on the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) have also been investigating the judiciary over allegations of money deposited on personal accounts of Judges, and other related queries raised by the Auditor-General, John Muwanga.

Saturday Vision has learnt that the Inspector General of Government (IGG), Justice Irene Mulyagonja, is also conducting special investigations into corruption in the judiciary.

According to a special audit report, the judiciary is also facing sh3.7b penalty for not remitting workers’ monthly contributions to the National Social Security Fund (NSSF) as required by law.

In total, therefore, the audit report noted, the judiciary owes NSSF sh5.2b; which includes the outstanding standard contributions of sh997.9m and interest accrued of sh545.2m, according to an audit conducted in November 2018.

The non-remittance of workers’ money, forced NSSF to impose the penalty after a compliance audit for the period January 2014 to August 2018 established that the courts of judicature had not remitted staff contributions worth sh997.9m.

“The penalty has been charged on the arrears as stipulated under section 14(1) of the NSSF Act, Cap 222. Penalties are computed at a rate of 10% per month for arrears in default,” the audit report pointed out.

There are also queries related to the diversion of sh3.2b meant for courts automation to clear the case backlog on buying vehicles for newly appointed judges.

Other reports submitted before the committee indicated that case backlog has shot through the roof for all courts save the Supreme Court which registered a 26.4% reduction for the year under review.

According to the Auditor General’s report, the case backlog for High Court is at 63,143 while the figure for Magistrate Grade I courts is at 66,515 cases.

In total, Ugandan courts, as of June 30, 2018, had 159,336 pending cases which, the Auditor General said, is a painful reminder of the challenges of getting justice through the formal justice system.

 

Related Articles

More From The Author

Related articles