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The African Rock Python is Africa’s largest snake

By Titus Kakembo

Added 3rd May 2019 12:08 PM

This reptile is encountered in a variety of habitats that include forests and semi deserts especially those found near sources of water.

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The African Rock Pythons in a pond at UWEC. (Photo by Titus Kakembo)

This reptile is encountered in a variety of habitats that include forests and semi deserts especially those found near sources of water.

WILD LIFE

Globally, the African Rock Python is ranked among the six largest snakes.

"It is in the lead, in size, on the Africa continent," said  Musenziyensi. "It is in the league of:  the green anaconda, reticulated python, Burmese python, Indian python and amethystine python besides measuring up to six meters."

A rescued African Rock Python that was admitted at Uganda Wildlife Education Center (UWEC) in the Acute Ward equivalent is steadily recovering.

 

 hey treasure their privacy hoto by itus akembo         They treasure their privacy (Photo by Titus Kakembo)

 

"The victim suffered a deep cut after a farmer in Mitiyana hurled stones and slashed it with a panga," revealed Scovia Musimenta. "Good enough a conservationist alerted us and we had a rapid response."

"At UWEC the wounds were dressed and medicine was administered. It is now in a stable condition and able to eat and drink," says animal keeper, Ignatiuos Musenziyensi at UWEC. "The pain was intense and we feared it would die but thank God it is already slithering about.”

It is feared but happens to be none venomous. Like the Mitiyana farmer, many people will not hesitate to get rungus to clobber it.

This reptile is encountered  in a variety of habitats that include forests and semi deserts especially those found near sources of water.

"When given a chance to live in peace, it becomes dormant during the dry season. To feed, it constricts its prey before digesting. It’s favourite food being antelope and occasionally crocodiles. It reproduces by egg-laying. Unlike most snakes, the female protects her nest and sometimes even her hatchlings,"  says Musensinyesi.

Unfortunately it is widely feared, and yet, it rarely kills humans. Although the snake is not endangered, it does face threats from habitat reduction and hunting.

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