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Peacocks court using feathers

By Titus Kakembo

Added 3rd April 2019 02:57 PM

The UWEC public relations officer, Scovia Musimenta says the beautiful feathers are used by the males to propose to the females.

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A female peacock is called a Peahen. (Photo by Titus Kakembo)

The UWEC public relations officer, Scovia Musimenta says the beautiful feathers are used by the males to propose to the females.

WILDLIFE

Have you ever seen a peacock? If the answer is no, jump into your travel boots and zoom to Uganda Wildlife Education Center (UWEC) in Entebbe.

You might get lucky and find the male with its feathers unfurled to catch the eye of the females.

“Getting it sweet talking a female is the mother of all treats this beauty can give guests,” says animal keeper Esther Nanduttu. “Traditionally they are believed by superstitious people to symbolise spirituality, protection and wellness.”

The Peacocks annual removing of all its feathers happens after every twelve months.

"The process is called molting and they grow back glittering vibrantly to attract any opposite sex," sums up Musiimenta. "They grow gradually as the colours get more vibrant and eye florescent bulb blue." 
 

There are Indians who associate it with one of their gods Lakshimi who is in charge of patience, kindness and good luck.

 

“They live in forests where they feed on grass, leaves, insects and small creatures,” adds Nanduttu. “They love moving in groups that are called party.”

The UWEC public relations officer,  Scovia Musimenta says the beautiful feathers are  used by the males  to propose to the females. 

“They are opened into a fan which touches the ground on the bottom, its back and the sides,” says Musiimenta. “And to the females size matters. They prefer the big and most decorous males!”  

 

Summing up that, most Ugandans, make the mistake of using the word Peacock to refer to both sexes.

“Only males are Peacock” asserts Musiimenta. “The females are Peahens. They feed on cereals and  insects. They are so proud they never mix with other birds.”

 
 

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