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Government gets sh14.4b from Global Fund to curb shortage of HIV/Aids drug

By John Odyek, Moses Mulondo

Added 23rd May 2018 02:57 PM

“From July we shall have the funds and the drugs,” Opendi.

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“From July we shall have the funds and the drugs,” Opendi.

PIC: Septrin is a wonder drug recommended for people living with HIV/AIDS 
 
HEALTH 
 
KAMPALA - The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has provided Uganda with sh14.4b to purchase septrin, a vital HIV drug that is scarce in Uganda.
 
Sarah Opendi, a state minister for health told Parliament yesterday that there was a funding shortage for septrin but the Global Fund with headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland had stepped in to boost the supply of the drug.
 
“From July we shall have the funds and the drugs available,” Opendi said.
 
The World Health Organisation (WHO) conditionally recommends the use of Seprin for people living with HIV/AIDS for the treatment of opportunistic infections.
 
Septrin is a wonder drug which, when taken daily, gives relief to and prolongs the life of people living with HIV/AIDS.
 
During the plenary sitting Paulson Luttamaguzi (Nakaseke South) raised concerns about the shortage of septrine in the country.
 

State minister for health, Sarah Opendi. (File photo) 

Luttamaguzi said the shortage of the drug has caused some doctors to sell the drug to patients while others advised them to put it on the black market.
 
Septrin (Cotrimoxazole) is an approved antibiotic that consists of a mixture of two drugs, trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole.
 
Both drugs prevent bacteria from reproducing by preventing the production of folic acid (vitamin B9).
 
The tablet form of cotrimoxazole is most commonly used by people with HIV as prevention against Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP).
 
It also offers a high level of protection against bacterial infections, urinary tract infections, isosporiasis (intestine disease), dysentery, food poisoning and bronchitis.

 

 

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