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Rwandans raise sh37m for genocide museum

By Vision Reporters

Added 6th April 2018 04:22 PM

The Rwanda high commissioner to Uganda, Maj. Gen. Frank Mugambage, said the museum that is under construction at Ggolo Memorial Site in Mpigi district requires sh3.7b for completion.

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The Rwanda high commissioner to Uganda, Maj. Gen. Frank Mugambage, said the museum that is under construction at Ggolo Memorial Site in Mpigi district requires sh3.7b for completion.

PIC: The Rwanda high commissioner to Uganda Rt. Maj. Gen. Frank Mugambage addressing the press on the 24th commemoration of the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda. This was at the Rwanda High Commission Kampala on April 6, 2018. (Credit: Lawrence Mulondo)

By Lisa Nsaba and Andrew Ssenyonga

RWANDA GENOCIDE

KAMPALA - The Rwanda community in Uganda has contributed sh37m towards the construction of a genocide museum in Mpigi, Uganda.

“This is an idea that we generated to in order to preserve the memory of victims of the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi,” the Rwanda high commissioner to Uganda Maj. Gen. Frank Mugambage said.

He said the museum that is under construction at Ggolo Memorial Site in Mpigi district requires sh3.7b for completion.

“This place is not only home to the largest number victims, but is also more accessible compared to the other memorial sites,” he said.

Mugambage revealed this during the announcing of the 24th commemoration of the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda activities at the Rwanda High Commission in Kampala on Friday.

This year’s commemoration will be held under the theme; “Kwibuka24: remember – unite - renew.”

Mugambage noted that the museum is envisaged to serve as an education centre that will promote messages against the genocide ideology, negating and revisionism.

“A constant bell should ring in the minds of all peace-loving people that we need to do more in preventing genocide from happening anywhere in the world,” he said.

The other memorial sites in Uganda are Kasensero in Rakai district and Lambu in Masaka district.

The museum will host the pictures of those who lost lives during the genocide, old clothes and history of Rwanda, among others.

For the 24th commemoration of the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda that took place in 1994, Rwandans from all over the world will come together to participate in a series of activities.

The activities will be launched on Saturday April 7, at Entebbe  and will be attended by government officials, diplomats and Rwandans from around the world.

There will be a night vigil on April 11, where the youth will be sensitised about the dangers of genocide at Livingstone University in Mbale district.

This will be followed by a public lecture at Kampala International University, Bushenyi campus on April 14 and another one to be held at St. Lawrence University - Mengo on April 20.

On April 21, there will be laying of a wreath at the memorial site in Kasensero landing site in Rakai district, where victims of the genocide were buried.

Mugambage also clarified that the genocide was not caused by a plane crash as some local media had published.

“Genocide does not just start abruptly, it is a planned movement aimed at one particular tribe or ethnic group. The 1994 genocide took place after a series of activities that had previously occurred in 1959, 1963 and 1973,” Mugambage explained.

He explained that it is planned in steps like dehumanisation, where those who are killed are considered symbols and not worth living.


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