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New Vision journalists donate to residents in Kuro village

By Abbey Ramadhan

Added 6th April 2018 04:07 PM

Ramadhan Abbey, a New Vision photographer, said he visited Kuro village in December in 2017 and was touched by the plight of residents. He therefore, took photos, which he posted on his Facebook account, calling on Good Samaritans to help the children.

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Ramadhan Abbey, a New Vision photographer, said he visited Kuro village in December in 2017 and was touched by the plight of residents. He therefore, took photos, which he posted on his Facebook account, calling on Good Samaritans to help the children.

PIC: Residents of Kuro village receiving clothes donated by New Vision Journalists. (Credit: Ramadhan Abbey)

YUMBE - Aisha Ijovi, 57, a resident of Kuro village in Yumbe district, has a reason to smile after New Vision journalists and employees of Esquare Hotel, Entebbe, donated to her clothes and shoes.

Ijovi, who is taking care of 15 orphans left behind by her deceased son, said the help rendered to them was timely.

Other beneficiaries of the donations were children, who received scholastic materials to boost their education.

"I thank the journalist for thinking about our community. Apart from lack of clothes, the community also faces a lot of challenges, including poverty, which is forcing parents to marry off their daughters for little money,’’ Ijovi said.

The New Vision journalists were touched by pictures highlighting the plight of Ijovi and the community of Kuro village that were posted on Facebook by one of them. While the needs of the community included lack of clothing, food and scholastic materials, among others, the journalists addressed the need for clothes and provided a few scholastic materials.

Ramadhan Abbey (wearing red T-shirt) with esidents of Kuro village. (Credit: Ramadhan Abbey)

In the initiative, they were joined by employees of Esquare Hotel, Entebbe in Wakiso district.

“From a photo on social media, we started the campaign to help the children and today, I am in Yumbe because of a picture that was posted on social media,” Joseph Jonga, an employee of Esquare Hotel, said.

He, however, called on other media to pick a leaf from New Vision journalists in order to transform communities in the country.

Ramadhan Abbey, a New Vision photographer, said he visited Kuro village in December in 2017 and was touched by the plight of residents. He therefore, took photos, which he posted on his Facebook account, calling on Good Samaritans to help the children.

“I am happy that the people responded to my call to support and transformed this community,” Abbey said during the handing over of donations on last week.

He appreciated those who contributed to the cause.

Muzamiru Ijosiga, the chairman Kuro village, said the community also faces the challenges of lack of clean water.

Kuro village is located in Ladonga sub-county in Yumbe district.



Rwandans raise sh37m for genocide museum
By Lisa Nsaba and Andrew Ssenyonga
Pix Lawrence Mulondo
The Rwanda community in Uganda has contributed sh37m towards the construction of a Genocide museum in Mpigi, Uganda.
 “This is an idea that was generated amongst ourselves to make a humble contribution in preserving the memory of victims of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi,” the Rwanda high commissioner to Uganda Maj. Gen. Frank Mugambage said.
Mugambaje said that the museum that under construction at Ggolo memorial site in Mpigi district requires a total of sh3.7bn for completion.
“This place is not only home to the largest number victims, but is also more accessible compared to the other memorial sites,” he said.
Mugambage revealed this during the announcing of the 24th commemoration of the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda activities at the Rwanda high commission in Kampala on Friday.
This year’s commemoration will be held under the theme; “Kwibuka24: remember- unite- renew.”
He noted that the museum is envisaged to serve as an education centre that will promote messages against Genocide ideology, negating and revisionism.
“A constant bell should ring in the minds of all peace loving people that we need to do more in preventing Genocide from happening anywhere else in the world,” he said.
 The other memorial sites in Uganda are Kasensero in Rakai district, and Lambu in Masaka district.
The museum will host the pictures of those who lost lives during the genocide, old clothes, and history of Rwanda among others.
For the 24th commemoration of the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda that took place in 1994, Rwandans from all over the world will come together to participate in a series of activities.
The activities will be launched on Saturday 7th April, at Entebbe that will be attended by government officials, diplomats and many Rwandans from around the world.
There will be a night vigil on 11th April where the youth will be sensitised about the dangers of genocide at Livingstone University in Mbale district.
This will be followed by a public lecture at Kampala International University in Bushenyi campus on 14th April and another one to be held at St. Lawrence University- Mengo on 20th of April.
Then on 21st there will be laying of a wreath at the memorial site in Kasensero landing site Rakai district where victims of the genocide were buried.
Mugambage also clarified that the genocide was not caused by a plane crash as some local media had published.
 “Genocide does not just start abruptly, it is planned and prepared movement aimed at one particular tribe or ethnic group. The 1994 genocide took place after a series of activities that previously occurred in 1959, 1963 and 1973,” Mugambage explained.
He explained that it is planned in steps like dehumanization, where those who are killed are considered symbols, not worth living.



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