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Doctors trained in early cancer detention and management

By Ritah Monica Mukasa

Added 9th December 2017 07:42 AM

“Close to 80% of the patients find out when the cancer is in its late stages. Cancer now kills more people than HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis combined,” he affirms.

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“Close to 80% of the patients find out when the cancer is in its late stages. Cancer now kills more people than HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis combined,” he affirms.

Due to the increasing dangers of cancer, medical practitioners in the western districts of Uganda have been trained in cancer management.

According to Dr. Abrahams Omoding, a Specialist Medical Oncologist with the Uganda Cancer Institute, there has been a recorded increase in the number of cancer patients in the region.

“Close to 80% of the patients find out when the cancer is in its late stages. Cancer now kills more people than HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis combined,” he affirms.

Omoding adds that although the signs and symptoms of the disease are still not well-known in many communities, there have been tremendous efforts to sensitize people and train medical practitioners in early identification of cancer cases.

Over 25 doctors who received certificates of attendance came from Mbarara, Ntungamo, Rukungiri, Kasese, Ibanda, Forportal and Kabale completed a three day training to curb the increasing dangers of cancer while sensitizing communities as well.

The initiative was sponsored by East African Development Bank in partnership with the British Council and the Royal College of Physicians.

Omoding, also one of the trainers says that the programme continues to focus on early detection, research and treatment of cancer and neurological disorders especially in communities where access to qualified professionals remains a challenge.

 octors in a group photo with their trainers after the training Doctors in a group photo with their trainers after the training.

 
“By training the doctors on the most important information on the signs and symptoms of cancer, we shall improve the ability to identify cancers at an early stage,” Omoding noted.

The training was part of a medical training programme that EADB is carrying out across four East African countries to train 600 medical professionals within a period of four years, to specialize in the treatment of cancer and neurological disorders.

This training followed those held at St. Francis Hospital, Nsambya, at the Uganda Cancer Institute, Mulago and in Soroti earlier this year.

Vivienne Yeda, the Director General of EADB reiterates that EADB’s course objective is to upgrade the ability of the target group of physicians to be able to better manage the patients with common neurological disorders.

“The fight against cancer should be taken up by all of us and as EADB we shall continue to train doctors until we meet our target of training 600 medical practitioners in four years,” Yeda added.

 “I have learnt a lot of new things and through this training, I will now be able to look at medical cases from a different aspect so as I can be able to diagnose my patients with utmost surety,” said Dr. Fred Tumusiime.

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