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Wednesday,August 21,2019 05:52 AM

Diabetes a major risk factor for developing heart disease

By Lillian Namusoke Magezi

Added 7th November 2017 01:21 PM

The World is preparing to commemorate the World Diabetes Day, which is marked on November 14 every year

Diabetesshot 703x422

The World is preparing to commemorate the World Diabetes Day, which is marked on November 14 every year

Diabetes mellitus has been noted as one of the major risk factors in the increasing incidents of heart failure and heart disease among people worldwide.

According to Prof. Upendra Kaul, a renowned cardiologist and chairman of the Batra Heart Centre in India, the prevalence, incidence and mortality of heart failure are all steadily increasing despite the dazzling progress in the diagnosis and treatment of all forms of cardiac disease.

Kaul made the remarks while addressing cardiologists in Kampala during a recent visit at the Norvik Hospital in Uganda where he held a medical camp for patients with heart complications.

Cardiologists noted that heart diseases are common and are the leading cause of death from non-communicable diseases worldwide. Kaul disclosed that in India where he works, the estimated prevalence of heart failure is between 1.3 and 4.6 million patients.

He added that the annual incidence of is between 0.5 to 1.8 millions.

During the discussions, cardiologists noted that in addition to diabetes mellitus, other causes of the increasing incidence of heart disease are an ageing population and a high prevalence of hypertension.

These are compounded by increasing urbanisation and affluence.

Challenges faced in developing countries

The director of the Uganda Heart Institute, Dr. John Omagino, noted that in developing countries such as Uganda, patients with heart failure generally present with the condition a decade earlier than their counterparts in West.

That is the average age of patients is 50 years compared to those in developed countries whose average age is 60 years.

In addition, Kaul noted that significantly more deaths are recorded among heart patients in the developing countries that those in the rest of the world.

He attributed this to seeking medical care late due to illiteracy, inaccessibility to health care, lack of insurance and poverty, which are common in such regions.

The remarks were made as the World prepares to commemorate the World Diabetes Day, which is marked on November 14 every year.

World diabetes day

This year, World Diabetes Day will be marked under the theme “Women and diabetes”, which aims at raising awareness about gestational diabetes.

 

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