TOP
  • Home
  • News
  • Struggling with English: Kyotera councillors to debate in vernacular

Struggling with English: Kyotera councillors to debate in vernacular

By Davis Buyondo

Added 5th November 2017 01:25 PM

The female councillor for Kakuuto tabled a motion to use Luganda. It was immediately passed prompting excitement among the majority

000t93on 703x422

The female councillor for Kakuuto tabled a motion to use Luganda. It was immediately passed prompting excitement among the majority

Some of the councillors who supported the motion to discuss in Luganda

Although English is Uganda’s official language, majority of councillors in Kyotera district including the district speaker, Peter Asiimwe Sasira, can hardly relate with the language, while others hardly comprehend the rules of procedure.

This always wastes most of their time when debating and passing important resolutions.

In a recent council sitting at Kasaali sub-county headquarters, majority of councillors laboured to express themselves in English while others remained silent until close of business.

In order to avoid such confusion, Agnes Namusiitwa, the female councillor for Kakuuto tabled a motion to use Luganda. It was immediately passed prompting excitement among the majority.

Namusiitwa said several councillors always fail to present their views in English, especially on fundamental issues that concern their electorate.

“Important ideas are usually left out because some councillors choose to remain silent due to low self-esteem,” she recounted.

According to the speaker, Sasira, it was a good resolution since it allows them to comfortably debate in the commonly spoken vernacular (Luganda).

However, Kintu Kisekulo, the Kyotera LC5 chairperson, said the councillors also struggle with understanding the Local Government Act and often give the chief administrative officer difficult time since he has to interpret the law for them and then still translate in Luganda.

Kisekulo attributed the misinterpretation of the rules of procedure to lack of induction training.

 He said most of them own a copy of regulations and guidelines governing the council proceedings, but they cannot interpret what they read.

 

 

 

 

Related Articles

More From The Author

Related articles