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World Hepatitis Summit for November

By Joyce Namutebi

Added 19th October 2017 01:20 PM

One of the objectives of the World Hepatitis Summit to be held from November 1 to 3, 2017 is to increase the number of countries developing practicable viral hepatitis action plans by making use of the latest public health research and technical support from WHO.

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One of the objectives of the World Hepatitis Summit to be held from November 1 to 3, 2017 is to increase the number of countries developing practicable viral hepatitis action plans by making use of the latest public health research and technical support from WHO.

As Hepatitis continues to cause death in countries including Uganda, Nigeria, India and Pakistan, a world meeting has been organised to work towards the elimination of the disease as a public health threat. 

One of the objectives of the World Hepatitis Summit to be held from November 1 to 3, 2017 is to increase the number of countries developing practicable viral hepatitis action plans by making use of the latest public health research and technical support from WHO.

Brazil has been chosen to partner and host the World Hepatitis Summit 2017, in recognition of the country’s ongoing national initiatives and consistent international leadership in the area of viral hepatitis, information posted by WHO said.

In Uganda, reports said that 3.5 million people were affected by Hepatitis.

Other objectives include; to support clause 1.3 of WHO’s Resolution WHA67.6 which urges Member States to “promote the involvement of civil society in all aspects of preventing, diagnosing and treating viral hepatitis”.

Also to discuss funding mechanisms for medicines and/or diagnostics through engagement of key stakeholders as well as to encourage and direct public health research to where it is needed by engaging key global funders.

An estimated 325 million people were living with chronic hepatitis infections (HBV or HCV) worldwide in 2015. Globally, 1.34 million people died of viral in 2015. Over 95% of people with hepatitis C can be completely cured within 2-3 months.

The theme of this year’s Summit is Implementing the Global Health Sector Strategy on Viral Hepatitis (GHSS): Towards the elimination of hepatitis as a public health threat

Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. The condition can be self-limiting or can progress to fibrosis (scarring), cirrhosis or liver cancer. Hepatitis viruses are the most common cause of hepatitis in the world but other infections, toxic substances (e.g. alcohol, certain drugs), and autoimmune diseases can also cause hepatitis, according to the organization.

There are five main hepatitis viruses, referred to as types A, B, C, D and E. These five types are of greatest concern because of the burden of illness and death they cause and the potential for outbreaks and epidemic spread. In particular, types B and C lead to chronic disease in hundreds of millions of people and, together, are the most common cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer.

Hepatitis A and E are typically caused by ingestion of contaminated food or water. Hepatitis B, C and D usually occur as a result of parenteral contact with infected body fluids.

Common modes of transmission for these viruses include receipt of contaminated blood or blood products, invasive medical procedures using contaminated equipment and for hepatitis B transmission from mother to baby at birth, from family member to child, and also by sexual contact.

 

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