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Public service standing orders to be revised

By Billy Rwothungeyo

Added 13th January 2017 07:04 AM

The standing orders is the signature policy document government uses to guide human resource management.

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The standing orders is the signature policy document government uses to guide human resource management.

KAMPALA - The Uganda public service standing orders are set to be revised again, Catherine Bitarakwate Musingwiire, the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Public Service, has revealed.

 “This document has been revised a number of times,” she said.

“The first document was in the 1950s, then again in the 1960s, revised in 2008, and the current version we are having was in 2010. As we speak, the standing orders are again due for revision,” she said.

The standing orders, which are under the docket of the Ministry of Public Service, is the signature policy document government uses to guide human resource management in the public service.

The permanent secretary explained that the document keeps getting revised because of the changing nature of the public service.

Musingwiire made the revelations at the ministry at an event where the Uganda Debt Network was handing over a copy of 100 copies of abridged versions of the standing orders.

Catherine Bitarakwate Musingwiire receives a copy of the standing orders from Gaamuwa Edward. (Credit: Billy Rwothungeyo)


After further consultations with the ministry, the Uganda Debt Network will present a substantially higher number of the standing orders to the ministry.

The permanent secretary said these documents will be given to public servants in local governments.

 “The local governments are where we have 60% of the entire workforce of the government of Uganda.”

Gaamuwa Edward, the vice chairman of the Uganda Debt Network board, said it is important for Ugandans to know information in important documents such as the standing orders.

 “Uganda is disadvantaged that the biggest numbers of its citizens especially in rural areas are unable to interpret laws and policies.

“This is attributed to the limited awareness which has undermined citizens’ knowledge of their roles and responsibilities, and ultimately, the blatant violation of such legislation, with little, or no public outcry yet access to information such be universal,” he said.

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