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Monday,November 19,2018 16:07 PM

Hundreds participate in fistula walk

By Cecilia Okoth, Andrew Masinde

Added 16th July 2016 10:04 PM

In Uganda, Obstetric Fistula represents an important public health problem with an estimated 140,000 to 200,000 women with fistula

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People participate of in the End to Fistula walk along Nasser Road organized Women at Work International. Photo by Godiver Asege

In Uganda, Obstetric Fistula represents an important public health problem with an estimated 140,000 to 200,000 women with fistula

The problem of Obstetric Fistula still remains a challenge in Uganda due to lack of awareness and for this matter, Women at Work International (WAWI) on Saturday organized a charity walk to make the disease more known to the public.

The Non-Governmental Organisation is among many organisations that are striving to end fistula, a curable disease.

Dr. Jacinto Amandua, the Commissioner of Clinical Services at the Ministry of Health, called for sensitisation on the matter and to increase resources for fistula service delivery and prevention at all levels.

"Everyone should participate in community mobilization of women and men to utilize available reproductive health services to prevent fistula and other complications," Amandua said.

Prolonged obstructed labour lasting more than 24 hours is one of the causes of Obstetric fistula. It is the single most devastating consequence of obstructed/ difficult labour to a mother in Sub Saharan Africa.

The leakage of urine and or stool leaves the women with a persistent odour resulting in a serious consequence like isolation from society due to shame, rejection by husbands, loss of status and dignity and eventually loss of income as they are unable to work.

In Uganda, Obstetric Fistula represents an important public health problem with an estimated 140,000 to 200,000 women with fistula. About 1,900 new cases occur every year despite the efforts to repair which indicates that it will take so many years to clear the backlog.

 

At the event, singer Halima Namakula, also the executive director WAWI launched a fistula song dubbed 'Let's Get Together' that she said is intended to stand in solidarity with the sufferers of fistula.

She advised young girls to desist from early sexual intercourse and also warned boys to let girls be girls.

"First finish school and meet someone responsible who bares the same vision as you do. Always endeavour to save money so you can resist the temptations of having sugar daddies that will ruin your future," Namakula told the students.

She also advised older women to always deliver from health facilities to avoid childbirth related complications and to space their children.

The walk attracted survivors and suffers of fistula, school going children both from secondary and university, local musicians like Rema Namakula, Irene Namatovu, Catherine Kusasira, partners like UNFPA (United Nations Population Fund) and Bank of Africa, Bidco and Capital Shoppers supermarket.

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