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Musicians, CSOs kick off sexual reproductive health campaign in institutions

By Vision Reporter

Added 11th June 2014 03:35 PM

The ''Kaleke kasome, kakyali kato'' ( translated as ‘leave the child learn, she is still young’) song by local artist Maurice Hassa remains very popular to many young people because of the message campaigning against cross generation sex, defilement, rape and child molestation.

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The ''Kaleke kasome, kakyali kato'' ( translated as ‘leave the child learn, she is still young’) song by local artist Maurice Hassa remains very popular to many young people because of the message campaigning against cross generation sex, defilement, rape and child molestation.

By Jeff Andrew Lule    
                             
The 'Kaleke kasome, kakyali kato' ( translated as ‘leave the child learn, she is still young’) song by local artist Maurice Hassa remains very popular to many young people because of the message campaigning against cross generation sex, defilement, rape and child molestation.
 
Since this song hit the airwaves over five years ago, it’s still a staple on days like World Aids Day and the Day of the African Child. 
 
This is because the message in the song is easy to understand.
 
It’s on this account that Reach a Hand Uganda (RAHU), a non-government organization has embarked on a campaign on sexual reproductive health in secondary schools, universities and other higher institutions of learning.
 
The four-month project is funded by Rutgers WFP under the ASK ALLIANCE in Uganda and supported by Civil Society Organizations, ministry of health and cooperate companies including Talent Africa.
 
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Students of Bishop Cyprian Secondary School attending one of the conferences. PHOTO/ Jeff Andrew Lule
 
The campaign held under the theme code name ‘YOUR WAY’ is aimed at promoting various messages of sexual reproductive health and rights through brochures, music, drama and documentaries.
 
Because of the power of music, the head of the project, Humphrey Nabimanya said they are working with 10 popular local artists on top of other icons to send forth the messages.
 
Artists include; Irene Ntale, GNL, Maurice Hassa, Cindy Sanyu and Ray Signature among others. 
Artists are to perform four songs and a documentary based on themes which were collectively developed.
 
Speaking at the launch of their campaigns in Kampala last Friday, Nabimanya  said the project is to inspire, educate  and encourage young people take care of their health by practicing safer sexual behavior, making informed choices and choosing to be responsible citizens. 
 
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Nabimanya speaking at one of the conferences. PHOTO/ Jeff Andrew Lule
 
It has been kicked off in different secondary schools in Busoga region.
 
“We are targeting 1,000,000 young people country wide including those living in urban and semi-urban communities like in the slums. 
 
Early pregnancies and HIV rates are still high due bad sexual practices among the youth and general public,” he notes.
According to the Uganda Demographic Health Survey (UDHS) 2011, at least 24% of teenagers in Uganda get pregnant, which translates into one out of every four teenagers.
 
Ronnie Tusingwire, a partnership coordinator, said many youth see musicians as role models and listen to what they are saying. 
 
The songs will also be promoted on various local TV stations and radios.
GNL Zamba, one of the musicians, said it is high time Ugandan musicians start guiding and educating the public through music than misleading them.
 
“Currently many musicians are misleading role models to their fans. The music we do is not informative, not educative at all,” he added.
 
Hassa, the singer of ‘Kaleke kasome’ said musicians have a lot of impact on society and need to change their style of doing things. 
 
“Why for God’s sake would someone use nude girls in a video? What does it add to society?” he said.
Ruth Mutesi , a second year student at Makerere university pursuing Information Communication Technology said youth need to be educated on sexual reproductive health to make right choices and avoid regrets in life.
 
Carol Mukyala, from Makerere Business School, said parents never talk to their children and it is one of the reasons why early pregnancies and HIV rates are high. 
 

Musicians, CSOs kick off sexual reproductive health campaign in institutions

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