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Silting affects fish production on Kalangala islands

By Vision Reporter

Added 20th June 2013 08:03 PM

The continuous environmental degradation by palm tree growers around Kalangala islands has greatly affected fish production in the lake, the State Minister for Environment, Flavia Munaaba has noted.

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The continuous environmental degradation by palm tree growers around Kalangala islands has greatly affected fish production in the lake, the State Minister for Environment, Flavia Munaaba has noted.

By Benon Tugumisirize    
   
The continuous environmental degradation by palm tree growers around Kalangala islands has greatly affected fish production in the lake, the State Minister for Environment, Flavia Munaaba has noted.
 
Munaaba said this poses a serious threat to the fish industry if no quick interventions are made to address the problem.
 
She made the remarks during the World Environment Day celebrations at Kibanga Primary school grounds in Kalangala district under the theme: “Think. Eat. Save the environment”.
 
Munaaba said she already had complaints that the palm tree out-growers had defied the 200metre buffer zone policy and cultivate up to the lakeshores.
 
“Out-growers now cultivate up to the lake shores which has increased a lot of silt in the lake. The fish production has reduced in the area because even the swamps that were initially left behind inform of buffer zones for fish to breed have been encroached on thus reducing productivity,” she noted.
 
She said because of the rampant environmental degradation, water levels at buffer zones have also reduced extremely.
 
Buffer zones are breeding places for fish and important for sieving water before it gets into the lake.
 
The manager of the National Association of Professional Environment (NAPE) Allan Kalangi, said there is need for a quick intervention on the increasing environmental degradation by palm tree out growers.
 
“The minister’s word has enhanced our advocacy and we urge all stakeholders to act and ensure that Lake Victoria is saved from pollution,” Kalangi said.
 
During the function, residents revealed that the path to the only spring water in Kulugulu village is impassible because of palm trees.
 
The LCV councilor of Kulugulu, Jim Gyagenda Kabiri also noted that the water is always contaminated by the pesticides used while spraying the palm trees.
 
“The palm trees have thorns that have covered our way to the only spring. We also have a threat of pesticides that are used in spraying their plantations. 
 
This has already started contaminating our water which put our residents at a risk getting infections,” Kabiri added.
 
Sande Ochola, the in charge of oil palm Uganda said he was going to investigate the allegations of blocking the path to the spring.
 
He also admitted that they apply fertilizers to the palm trees, but eight metres from the spring water.
 
“We need a good a relationship with the residents and will work towards solving the alleged problems,” he noted 
 

Silting affects fish production on Kalangala islands

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